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New York City

397 expert recommended attractions

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Empire State Building

Midtown 98 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

View unlike any other (except maybe Top of the Rock). — Not For Tourists

There’s no better introduction to New York than a visit to the Empire State Building... the apex of the New York skyline. — Frommer's

Magnificent 360-degree views of New York from the 86th- and 102nd-floor observatories — Where

One of the city's most beautiful—and popular—attractions, with thousands of people visiting every day. — Condé Nast Traveler

The Empire State Building is an art deco monument to progress, a symbol for New York City, and a star in some great romantic scenes, on- and off-screen. — Fodor's

Frick Collection

Upper East Side 98 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The opulent residence that houses a private collection of great masters (from the 14th through the 19th centuries) was originally built for industrialist Henry Clay Frick. — Time Out

Lots of furniture. — Not For Tourists

Housed in an exquisite Beaux Arts mansion on the Upper East Side represents the personal holdings of Henry Clay Frick. — Condé Nast Traveler

This spectacular art collection sits in a mansion built by prickly steel magnate Henry Clay Frick, one of the many such residences that made up Millionaires’ Row. — Lonely Planet

Henry Clay Frick could afford to be an avid collector of European art after amassing a fortune as a pioneer in the coke and steel industries at the turn of the 20th century. — Frommer's

Central Park

New York City 96 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Stretching from 59th to 110th streets and between Fifth Avenue and Central Park West, the popular urban paradise—New York City’s backyard—spans 843 lush acres. — Where

The calming yang to the city's fervent go-go yin, with ample nooks and open fields to allow for just about any pursuit. — Concierge

Central Park is an urbanized Eden that offers residents and visitors alike a bite of the apple. — Fodor's

Located in the middle of the city’s densest borough, Central Park feels like a natural haven. — Condé Nast Traveler

Just a block and a half from Loews Regency sits New York's landscaped wonder and one of the greatest urban parks in the world, Central Park. — Afar Magazine

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Upper East Side 96 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

In 1943 art patrons Solomon R. Guggenheim and his wife, Irene Rothschild, commissioned architect Frank Lloyd Wright to design a permanent home for their collection of modern art. — Michelin Guide

This spiraling white concrete structure, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, is one of the most iconic buildings in NYC, if not in all of the USA. — Afar Magazine

Wright's only building in NYC, but it's one of the best. — Not For Tourists

The unique spiral building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright sends visitors to the top floor first and then allows them to wind their way down along a corkscrew ramp. — Condé Nast Traveler

It's been called a bun, a snail, a concrete tornado, and even a giant wedding cake; bring your kids, and they'll probably see it as New York's coolest opportunity for skateboarding. — Frommer's

Statue of Liberty

New York City 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The Statue of Liberty, her torch upraised in welcome since 1886, was a gift to the US from the people of France. — Michelin Guide

For the millions who came by ship to America in the last century... Lady Liberty, standing in the Upper Bay, was their first glimpse of America. — Frommer's

Lady Liberty—or Liberty Enlightening the World, as she’s officially known—was a gift from France on America’s 100th birthday. — Time Out

In a city full of American icons, the Statue of Liberty is perhaps the most famous. — Lonely Planet

It's hard to imagine a more evocative and familiar symbol of the United States than the lady with the torch. — Concierge

Tenement Museum

Lower East Side 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This is America's first urban living-history museum dedicated to the life of immigrants. — Fodor's

Great illustration of turn-of-the-century (20th, that is) life. — Not For Tourists

Searching for a place to house a museum honoring American immigrants, Ruth Abram unearthed 97 Orchard Street. — Travel + Leisure

This museum puts the neighborhood’s heartbreaking but inspiring heritage on full display in three recreations of turn-of-the-20th-century tenements. — Lonely Planet

Turn-of-the-20th-century immigrant life on Manhattan's Lower East Side is illustrated through guided tours of authentically preserved tenement apartments. — Where

Brooklyn Museum

Brooklyn 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This encyclopedic museum is housed in a five-story, 560,000-sq-ft beaux arts building designed by McKim, Mead & White. — Lonely Planet

The museum is known for its consistently remarkable temporary exhibitions as well as its excellent permanent collection. — Frommer's

Housed in a monumental Beaux-Arts building, this is New York's second-largest art museum besides the Met, and well worth a visit if you're in the borough. The collection contains a... — Michelin Guide

Brooklyn’s premier institution is a less-crowded alternative to Manhattan’s bigger-name spaces. — Time Out

Breathtakingly beautiful building, excellent collection. — Not For Tourists

Ellis Island

New York City 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Roughly 12 million immigrants passed through this island as they entered America from the late 1800s through the mid-1950s, sometimes at the rate of thousands a day. — Concierge

Free ranger-guided tours take in the Baggage Room, the "Peopling of America" exhibit, and the remarkable 30-minute documentary "Island of Hope, Island of Tears" in the theatre room. — The Telegraph

Trace the history of U.S. immigration with a visit to the three floors of objects, photographs and interactive displays housed on the famous island next door to Lady Liberty herself. — Time Out

Ellis Island is situated about halfway between lower Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor. — Michelin Guide

The island's main building, now a national monument, reopened in 1990 as the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, which is divided into four major exhibit areas. — Fodor's

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Upper East Side 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

If you can only visit one museum in New York, this should be it; the Met’s hallowed halls contain one of the most dazzling and comprehensive classical art collections in the world. — Afar Magazine

You could spend weeks here admiring the collections. — Condé Nast Traveler

You could spend weeks here admiring the collections. — Concierge

This sprawling encyclopedic museum, founded in 1870, houses one of the biggest art collections in the world. — Lonely Planet

Home of blockbuster after blockbuster, the Metropolitan Museum of Art attracts some five million people a year, more than any other spot in New York City. — Frommer's

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

Midtown 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Known the world over as MoMA, the glassy Yoshio Taniguchi-designed Midtown building houses one of the most influential collections of modern art in the world. Van Gogh, Cézanne, Matisse,... — The Telegraph

MoMA is a thing of beauty. The collection is stunning and extensive. One could easily get lost in exploring the building alone. — On the Grid

This is where you’ll find van Gogh’s Starry Night, Cezanne’s Bather, Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, and the great sculpture by Rodin, Monument to Balzac. — Frommer's

The world's preeminent museum for modern art reopened in November 2004 on its original site in a new building designed by architect Yoshio Taniguchi. — Concierge

Founded in 1929, MoMA is one of NYC’s most popular museums, home to more than 100,000 pieces of modern artwork, most by A-listers. — Lonely Planet

Whitney Museum of American Art

West Village 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Always has something to talk about, like the controversial Biennial. — Not For Tourists

Established in 1931 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney as a showcase for American artists, the Whitney continues to be the premier museum in the world for 20th-century American art. — Afar Magazine

Founded in 1930, the Whitney Museum of American Art has earned the distinction of being the first museum focusing on living American artists. — Travel + Leisure

With its bold collection of 20th- and 21st-century contemporary American art, the Whitney presents an eclectic mix drawn from more than 19,000 works in its permanent collection. — Fodor's

Designed by architect Renzo Piano, the museum’s building in the Meatpacking District and on the shore of the Hudson River, contains more than 50,000 square feet of indoor galleries. — Where

The Met Cloisters

New York City 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This subdivision of The Metropolitan Museum of Art holds a vast collection of medieval art, including the renowned 15th- and 16th-century Unicorn Tapestries. — Where

The Met's storehouse of medieval art. Great herb garden, nice views. — Not For Tourists

Set within lush Fort Tryon Park in Upper Manhattan, the Cloisters museum and garden offers visitors an in-depth look at European medieval art, architecture, and culture. — Travel + Leisure

Set in a lovely park overlooking the Hudson River, the Cloisters houses the Met’s medieval art and architecture collections. — Time Out

The Cloisters is a series of medieval passageways reconstructed from French monasteries and incorporated within a modern museum. — Concierge

New York Botanical Garden

The Bronx 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

One of the largest and oldest gardens in the US, this glorious green space displays a wonderful array of plants and blooms, and conducts important botanical research. — Michelin Guide

Considered one of the leading botany centers of the world, this 250-acre garden is one of the best reasons to make a trip to the Bronx. — Fodor's

This 250-acre green space has plenty of year-round and seasonal plants and flowers as well as an annual holiday train show and exhibits around everything from medicinal herbs to Frida Kahlo. — Condé Nast Traveler

Flowers galore in the heart of da Bronx. — Not For Tourists

Established in 1891, the 250-acre New York Botanical Garden is an oasis for pavement-pounding city dwellers, just a 20-minute Metro North ride from Grand Central. — Concierge

Grand Central Terminal

Midtown 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

In the entrance pavilion to this truly grand terminal, there is a small plaque dedicated to Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. — Concierge

The 1913 Beaux Arts train station is the city’s most spectacular point of arrival. — Time Out

The greatest visual impact comes when you enter the vast majestic main concourse. — Frommer's

Even if you're not boarding a train to the 'burbs, it's worth exploring the grand, vaulted main concourse and gazing up at the restored ceiling, decorated with a star map. — Lonely Planet

The restoration of this beautiful Beaux-Arts behemoth in the late 1990's has created the perfect place to enjoy a drink or dinner while watching commuters race for their trains. — Travel + Leisure

Washington Square Park

Greenwich Village 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Known for its marble arch, which architect Stanford White modeled after the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, this historic park has been renovated to include expanded lawns and plantings. — Where

What was once a potter’s field and a square for public executions is now the unofficial town square of the Village. — Lonely Planet

The hippies who famously turned up and tuned out in Washington Square Park are still there in spirit, and indeed often in person. — Time Out

NYU students, street musicians, skateboarders, jugglers, chess players, and those just watching the grand opera of it all generate a maelstrom of activity. — Fodor's

Located in the heart of Greenwich Village with a tradition of celebrating nonconformity, this landmark has been a gathering place for street entertainers, musicians, poets and chess players. — On the Grid

American Museum of Natural History

Upper West Side 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

No matter which wing you wander through or where your curiosities lie (dinosaurs, gems or something else entirely), it’s hard to explore this Upper West Side fixture without being awestruck. — Time Out

No child—or adult for that matter—who has strolled under the enormous blue whale has ever forgotten this cavernous museum on the Upper West Side. — Condé Nast Traveler

This is one of the hottest museum tickets in town, thanks to the Rose Center for Earth and Space, whose four-story-tall planetarium sphere hosts the show Journey to the Stars. — Frommer's

Guests explore halls filled with full-scale dinosaur skeletons, fossils, dioramas, artifacts, gems and minerals (including a rare 2-foot-long jade slab), meteorites and more — Where

The largest natural history museum in the world is also one of the most impressive sights in New York. — Fodor's

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn 91 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A New York icon, the Brooklyn Bridge was the world’s first steel suspension bridge. — Lonely Planet

A hybrid cable-stayed suspension bridge and one of the oldest of its kind, the Brooklyn Bridge, which connects Manhattan and Brooklyn over the East River. — Where

When it was completed in 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge was a marvel of civil engineering—the longest suspension bridge in the world. — Concierge

A walk across its promenade—a boardwalk elevated above the roadway, shared by pedestrians, in-line skaters, and cyclists—takes about 40 minutes and delivers exhilarating views. — Fodor's

This famed structure was one of the great engineering triumphs of the 19C. — Michelin Guide

Brooklyn Botanic Garden

Brooklyn 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The 52 acres of this beloved Brooklyn retreat, one of the finest botanic gardens in the country, are a must-see, especially in spring and summer. — Fodor's

The Japanese Hill-and-Pond Garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, followed by a walk through adjacent Prospect Park, the, well, second-greatest greensward in New York. — Travel + Leisure

Sniff the Titan Arum's rotting flesh.  — Atlas Obscura

A beautiful and peaceful spot inside and out. Cherry blossoms in spring are awe inspiring. — Not For Tourists

Those searching for a little peace and quiet would do well to spend a few hours at this verdant oasis. — Time Out

Chrysler Building

Midtown 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A monument to modern times and the mighty automotive industry, the former Chrysler headquarters wins many a New Yorker's vote for the city's most iconic and beloved skyscraper. — Fodor's

This is perhaps the 20th century’s most romantic architectural achievement, especially at night when the lights in its triangular openings play off its steely crown. — Frommer's

The Chrysler Building is topped by a distinctive spire of radiant stainless steel arches that glimmers in sunlight and glows in the nighttime illuminations. — Michelin Guide

His edifice may no longer have the height advantage, but architecture critics (and many New Yorkers) give it the edge on style. — Concierge

The 77-floor Chrysler Building makes most other skyscrapers look like uptight geeks. — Lonely Planet

Rockefeller Center

Midtown 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A Streamline Moderne masterpiece, Rockefeller Center is one of New York’s central gathering spots for visitors and New Yorkers alike. — Frommer's

John D. Rockefeller Jr.'s Art Deco masterpiece, Radio City Music Hall, was the first component of his eponymous Midtown development. — Concierge

There are views, and then there is the view from the Top of the Rock. — Lonely Planet

Famous for its gilded statue of Prometheus and home of NBC-TV studios and Radio City Music Hall, this Midtown Art Deco landmark spans approximately 22 acres. — Where

The 76-foot-tall Norway spruce is the crown jewel in the city's pantheon of Christmas trees; be prepared for insane crowds if you decide to take a peek. — Time Out

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  • Museums
    87 museums and galleries
  • Outdoors
    64 parks, gardens and outdoor attractions
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    38 places of historical interest

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