Charleston

Showing 60 attractions
9
Charlestowne
7 reviews
Set amid spacious gardens, the Russell House is widely recognized as one of America’s most important Neoclassical dwellings — Where
9
7 reviews
Step into the Mountain Forest and find water splashing over a rocky gorge as river otters play. — Fodor's
9
6 reviews
The property still looks as it did in 1858, before the outbreak of the Civil War. — Frommer's
9
7 reviews
Charleston’s City Market dates back to 1788 and remains a fun if touristy place to explore, crammed with arts-and-crafts stalls, restaurants, and the city’s famed Gullah “basket ladies”. — Frommer's
9
Charlestowne
7 reviews
The house has remained in the Alston family, who open the first two floors to visitors (on guided tours only). — Frommer's
8
Charlestowne
7 reviews
This house tour inspires even a reluctant patriot with its incredible ties to the Revolutionary War — Condé Nast Traveler
8
4 reviews
This man-made island at the entrance to Charleston Harbor saw the first shots of the Civil War in 1861. — Michelin Guide
8
4 reviews
Today visitors are welcome on the remaining 738 acres, which also host many public and private events, as well as serving as a popular film location. — Michelin Guide
8
French Quarter
5 reviews
The museum tells the stories of the African-Americans who passed through its gates and their contributions to American society and culture. Open M-Sa 9 am-5 pm. — Where
8
5 reviews
This elegant red-brick mansion was built in 1803 for wealthy rice planter Joseph Manigault (a descendant of French Huguenots). — Frommer's
8
Downtown
5 reviews
If you’re there during the week, stop by on a Wednesday night, when you can hear lectures and watch film screenings on the ground level. — goop
8
Charlestowne
3 reviews
8
4 reviews
See the remnants of the plantation of one of the principal authors and signers of the U.S. Constitution. Watch for special events. Open daily. Free admission. — Where
8
6 reviews
Permanent galleries include the Lowcountry History Hall... charting the struggles of the first African American slaves and European settlers. — Frommer's
8
5 reviews
This is the site of the first permanent English settlement in the Carolinas, which happened more than 300 years ago — Where
8
French Quarter
2 reviews
Amble through the churchyards, where notable South Carolinians such as John C. Calhoun are buried. — Fodor's
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