Fiji

Showing 14 attractions
8
4 reviews
This modest branch of the Suva-based museum contains old photos of Levuka, which confirm that little of the townscape has changed since it served as Fiji's capital nearly 150 years ago. — Fodor's
8
2 reviews
This national park protects over 80% of Taveuni's total area, covering about 150 sq km (57 sq mi) of rainforest and coastal forest. — Lonely Planet
8
2 reviews
This riotously bright Hindu temple is one of the few places outside India where you can see traditional Dravidian architecture; the wooden carvings of deities travelled here from India. — Lonely Planet
8
2 reviews
This wildlife sanctuary is supported by the National Trust for Fiji and several international parks and conservation bodies, and showcases some magnificent wildlife — Lonely Planet
8
2 reviews
The best place for fish, fruit and vegetables. — Lonely Planet
8
2 reviews
Just 15 minutes north of the bustling city center is this oasis of flora and birdlife, crisscrossed by streams and rivers — Fodor's
7
3 reviews
More than a garden, this must-see spot is an absolute botanic bonanza. — Lonely Planet
7
2 reviews
Not far from Garden Island Resort is this local hangout where kids slide down a natural chute of smoothed rocks into a natural pool — Fodor's
7
2 reviews
Framed by thick, ridiculously green jungle, these three waterfalls (also known as the Bouma Falls) epitomise the 'Garden Island' epithet Taveuni is famous for. — Lonely Planet
7
2 reviews
One of Fiji's most diverse rain forests, this 300-acre reserve is rich in spectacular mountaintop vistas, bird species, and exquisite trees, flowers, and plants. — Fodor's
7
2 reviews
If you have commandeered your own taxi, ask the driver to show you the resting place of Fiji’s most notorious cannibal. — Lonely Planet
7
2 reviews
Never mind the pricey resort spas: slopping around this natural mud pit and the geothermal hot pools will have you feeling like a million bucks. — Lonely Planet
7
2 reviews
Windblown and rugged, they stand around 5km long, up to 1km wide and on average about 20m high, rising to about 60m at the western end. They were made a national park in 1989. — Lonely Planet
7
2 reviews
Savusavu-born Justin Hunter, whose father was American, studied marine biology and worked in the United States before returning to start this pearl farm in 2000 — Fodor's
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