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Florence

77 expert recommended attractions

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Duomo - Cattedrale di Santa Maria del Fiore

Duomo & Piazza della Signoria 96 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

For centuries, people have commented that Florence's cathedral is turned inside out, its exterior boasting Brunelleschi's famous dome and a festive cladding of white, green, and pink marble. — Frommer's

The Duomo, Baptistry, and Campanile are all part of the UNESCO World Heritage site that covers the entire historic center of Florence. — Afar Magazine

To visit is to be awed. — Condé Nast Traveler

Building began in the 1290s under the direction of Arnolfo Di Cambio, and the structure was designed to supersede all other churches in size and sheer magnificence. — Concierge

The insoluble problem of the dome was solved with genius by Brunelleschi in 1420. — Michelin Guide

Museo Nazionale del Bargello

Duomo & Piazza della Signoria 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Today, the museum houses a fabulous collection of sculpture by Michelangelo, Donatello, Benvenuto Cellini, Giambologna, and others. — Concierge

It was behind the stark exterior of Palazzo del Bargello, Florence's earliest public building, that the podestà meted out justice from the late 13th century until 1502. — Lonely Planet

Inside this 1255 Gothic palazzo is Florence's premier sculpture museum, with works by Michelangelo, the della Robbias, and Donatello. — Frommer's

Palazzo del Podestà has a remarkable courtyard... is home to a museum of great importance. — Michelin Guide

This oft-overlooked museum in Florence's centuries-old former jail houses what is perhaps the city's best collection of sculpture. — Condé Nast Traveler

Museo di San Marco

San Marco 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The themes may become repetitive, but the artistic importance of the works is impressive. — Let's Go

Has works by Fra Angelico (note the Annunciation gracing the staircase), who decorated each cell with a fresco. — Michelin Guide

Housed in the monastery of San Marco, this museum pays homage to the delicate, spiritual work of Fra Angelico who lived and worked here as a monk from 1435-1445. — Afar Magazine

A testament to the work of painter–monk Fra Angelico, this museum is housed in the Dominican convent of San Marco. — Concierge

His unostentatious and direct paintings exalt the simple beauties of the contemplative life. — Fodor's

Uffizi Gallery

Duomo & Piazza della Signoria 91 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The greatest collection of Italian Renaissance painting anywhere in the world. — Condé Nast Traveler

The Uffizi contains the world's most magnificent collection of Renaissance art from the greatest of Old Masters. — Travel + Leisure

Welcome to the Uffizi. The first thing you should know about this museum is that Michelangelo’s David is not here—he’s on the other side of town, in the Accademia. Also, the Mona Lisa is... — Let's Go

Works by Giotto, Masaccio, Paolo Uccello, Sandro Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Perugino, Michelangelo, Raphael Sanzio, Titian, Caravaggio…and the list goes on. — Frommer's

The greatest collection of Renaissance painting in the world is housed in the former administrative offices of Cosimo de' Medici's court, a 16th-century building designed by Vasari. — Concierge

Boboli Gardens

Oltrarno 91 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A fine example of an Italian terraced garden, with terraces, ramps, flights of steps and different perspectives. — Michelin Guide

The magnificent Boboli Gardens, once the playground of the Medici family, are laid out over the hill behind the Pitti Palace, a green oasis amid Florence's stern stone palazzi and narrow streets. — Travel + Leisure

A visit here can be disappointing, because the gardens are somewhat underplanted and under-cared for, but it's still a great walk with some terrific views. — Fodor's

The only park in the center of Florence, the Boboli Gardens (behind Palazzo Pitti) provides a green oasis in the midst of the city's dense Renaissance architecture. — Concierge

The Boboli Gardens feel like a cross between Central Park and Versailles. — Let's Go

Palazzo Vecchio

Duomo & Piazza della Signoria 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Topped by a fine 94m-high bell tower, this huge building dominates its square. — Michelin Guide

Florence's fortress palace, with its striking crenellations and 94m-high tower, was designed by Arnolfo di Cambio between 1298 and 1314 for the signoria (city government). — Lonely Planet

Florence's medieval-style city hall, Palazzo Vecchio overflows with acres of frescoes depicting the Medici family's leading figures and feats. — Condé Nast Traveler

One of the highlights is the Room of the 500s, which features worryingly aggressive/erotic statues for a room that used to hold a political council. — Let's Go

Florence's fortresslike town hall was built from 1299 to 1302 on the designs of Arnolfo di Cambio, Gothic master builder of the city. — Frommer's

Accademia Gallery

San Lorenzo 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The vast majority of the people in the mile-long line outside this former art school are here for one reason only: to ogle what is probably the most famous nude sculpture in the world. — Concierge

The Accademia is remarkable for its collection of sculpture by Michelangelo. — Michelin Guide

“David”—“Il Gigante”—is much larger than most people imagine... he hasn’t faded with time, either. — Frommer's

There’s always a long line outside Florence’s Academy of Fine Arts, everyone waiting to see arguably the world’s most famous sculpture: Michelangelo’s David. — Travel + Leisure

The collection of Florentine paintings, dating from the 13th to the 18th centuries, is largely unremarkable, but the sculptures by Michelangelo are worth the price of admission. — Fodor's

Ponte Vecchio

Oltrarno 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Still worth visiting. — Condé Nast Traveler

The oldest and most famous bridge across the Arno, the Ponte Vecchio was built in 1345 by Taddeo Gaddi. — Frommer's

The city's oldest surviving bridge... spans the Arno at its narrowest point. — Michelin Guide

The first documentation of a stone bridge here, at the narrowest crossing point along the entire length of the Arno, dates from 972. — Lonely Planet

Gold shops line up on its curvy backside, providing couples on the promenade something to talk about. — Let's Go

Medici Chapels

Santa Maria Novella 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Attached to the church of San Lorenzo, this complex of three rooms is the final resting place of Medicis great and small. — Concierge

When Michelangelo built the New Sacristy between 1520 and 1533... was to be a tasteful monument to Lorenzo the Magnificent and his generation of fairly pleasant Medici. — Frommer's

Nowhere is Medici conceit expressed so explicitly as in their mausoleum, the Medician Chapels. — Lonely Planet

The funerary chapel... is striking for its sheer scale and its sombre aspect. The New Sacristy (built to house the Medici tombs - note the sculpture) is Michelangelo's. — Michelin Guide

The dark Cappella Principe  hovers over the sky and guards six mighty-looking tombs of Medici rulers. — Let's Go

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Museo dell'Opera del Duomo

Duomo & Piazza della Signoria 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

At press time, the museum was undergoing some serious expansion, and the results will be splendid when work is completed in October 2015. — Fodor's

Art lovers will be delighted by its multiple masterpieces by great figures such as Michelangelo, Donatello and Della Robbia. — Michelin Guide

This museum... safeguards sacred and liturgical treasures that once adorned the duomo, baptistry and campanile. — Lonely Planet

This museum exists mainly to house the sculptures removed from the niches and doors of the Duomo group for restoration and preservation from the elements. — Frommer's

This museum houses works, mostly sculptural, that once adorned the facade of the Duomo, Giotto's campanile (bell tower) and the baptistery. — Travel + Leisure

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Palazzo Medici Riccardi

San Lorenzo 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Masaccio and Masolino’s frescoes in the Brancacci Chapel are better known – and very lovely they are too, breathing the simple humanism of the early Renaissance. — The Telegraph

The building's exterior gives little indication as to the splendour which awaits within. — Michelin Guide

A door off the right of the entrance courtyard leads up a staircase to the Cappella dei Magi, the oldest chapel to survive from a private Florentine palace. — Frommer's

The main attraction of this palace, begun in 1444 by Michelozzo for Cosimo de' Medici, is the interior chapel, the so-called Cappella dei Magi on the piano nobile (second) floor. — Fodor's

The main reason for visiting this solid 15th-century palazzo, built by Michelozzo, and now the city's prefettura, is to see Benozzo Gozzoli's delightful Cappella dei Magi on the first floor. — Concierge

Giotto's Bell Tower

Duomo 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Giotto's slender bell tower illustrates the originality of Florentine Gothic and the significance given to horizontal lines and geometric decoration. — Michelin Guide

At each observation deck, we stopped to catch our breath and to take in the view. As is often the case in life, the higher and harder we climbed, the better the view got. — Afar Magazine

What makes this 84m-high (276-ft.) view different are great views of the Baptistery as you ascend, and the best close-up shot in the entire city of Brunelleschi's dome. — Frommer's

Begun in 1334 by Giotto, Florence Cathedral’s soaring bell tower rises nearly as high as the cathedral’s dome. — Lonely Planet

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Basilica di Santa Croce

Santa Croce 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

It's the 14th-century Giotto frescoes in the Peruzzi and Bardi chapels that most impress. — Condé Nast Traveler

Michelangelo’s tomb explodes with color and features a painting of the statue he’d intended for his final resting place. Dante’s tomb is just gray, but it holds some inordinately large statues. — Let's Go

Basilica di Santa Croce remains a historical gem that can better help us understand Stendhal, and a testament to the power that devoted artists can have on humanity. — Afar Magazine

The Pazzi Chapel sited at the end of the attached cloister bears witness to the architectural genius of Brunelleschi. — Michelin Guide

Most visitors come to see the tombs of Michelangelo, Galileo and Ghiberti. — Lonely Planet

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Basilica San Miniato al Monte

Boboli & San Miniato al Monte 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This church, like the Baptistery, is a fine example of Romanesque architecture and is one of the oldest churches in Florence, dating from the 11th century. — Fodor's

High atop a hill, its gleaming white-and-green facade visible from the valley below, San Miniato is one of the few ancient churches of Florence to survive the centuries virtually intact. — Frommer's

Take in the views from the outside, walk the grounds, and see the old cemetery. Entrance to the church is free, and if you're lucky, you might even hear the monks singing. — Afar Magazine

Five minutes uphill from Piazzale Michelangelo is this wonderful Romanesque church, dedicated to St Minius, an early-Christian martyr in Florence. — Lonely Planet

The Hill Promenade offers superb glimpses of the city from the Oltrarno. — Michelin Guide

Palazzo Pitti

Pitti 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The Pitti contains five museums, including one of the best collections of canvases by Raphael in the world. — Frommer's

The gallery presents primarily Tuscan works, illustrating the various trends in Italian painting and sculpture from the late 18C to the first decades of the 20C — Michelin Guide

Art lovers should head straight to the Palatine Gallery, housing works by Raphael, Titian, Rubens, and Caravaggio. — Travel + Leisure

Buy and book tickets for the Palazzo Pitti museums. — Lonely Planet

Palazzo Pitti is now our portal to Renaissance Florence. It is divided into six sections. — Afar Magazine

Museo di Palazzo Davanzati

Uffizi 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The prestigious Davanzati family owned this 14th-century palace in one of Florence's swankiest medieval neighborhoods. — Fodor's

A narrow, three-storied building, embellished by a covered terrace supported by four small columns,. — Michelin Guide

Tucked inside a 14th-century warehouse and residence... this palazzo museum with wonderful central loggia, is a gem. — Lonely Planet

One of the best-preserved 14th-century palaces... dedicated to domestic life in the medieval and Renaissance period. — Frommer's

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Palazzo Strozzi

Santa Maria Novella 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

One of the finest examples of domestic architecture of the period anywhere. — Michelin Guide

The Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi has quickly become a rival to Palazzo Grassi in Venice. — Concierge

The Strozzi family built this imposing palazzo in an attempt to outshine the nearby Palazzo Medici. — Fodor's

Epitomizes the city's fresh art scene. — Condé Nast Traveler

Host today to some of the city's most exciting blockbuster art exhibitions. — Lonely Planet

Piazza Santa Croce

Santa Croce 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Standing in the Piazza Santa Croce, a statue of Dante looms over the square from the corner. — Afar Magazine

Originally outside the city's 12th-century walls, this piazza grew with the Franciscans, who used the large square for public preaching. — Fodor's

The Gothic interior is vast, with huge, pointed stone arches creating the aisles and an echoing nave trussed with wood beams, in all feeling vaguely barnlike. — Frommer's

This square was initially cleared in the Middle Ages, primarily to allow hordes of the faithful to gather when the church itself was full. — Lonely Planet

One of Florence's oldest and most dignified squares. — Michelin Guide

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Museo Archeologico Nazionale

San Marco 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Of the Etruscan, Egyptian, and Greco-Roman antiquities here, the Etruscan collection is particularly notable—one of the most important in Italy (the other being in Turin). — Fodor's

Note in particular the Chimera (early 4C BC)... and among the important collection of Antique pottery (Greek, Roman and Etruscan), the famous François vase (the museum's principal treasure). — Michelin Guide

This embarrassingly rich collection, in an apparently permanent state of reorganization, is often overlooked by visitors in full-throttle Renaissance mode. — Frommer's

The musuem has held Medici collections of Etruscan, Roman, Greek, and Egyptian art since 1870. — Travel + Leisure

About 200m southeast of the piazza is this museum, whose rich collection of finds, including most of the Medici hoard of antiquities, plunges you deep into the past and offers an alternative to Renaissance splendour. — Lonely Planet

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Piazza della Signoria

Duomo & Piazza della Signoria 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

P. della Signoria is the place to go if you want to see sculptures without the museum prices. The Loggia, a portico full of statues that’s as legit as any room in the Uffizi, is free. — Let's Go

This monumental square, dominated by the somber Palazzo Vecchio and its iconic tower, has been Florence's administrative hub for hundreds of years, and it still functions as city hall today. — Concierge

Edged by historic cafes, crammed with Renaissance sculptures and presided over by magnificent Palazzo Vecchio, this photogenic piazza has been the hub of local life for centuries. — Lonely Planet

Just off the main square, Piazza della Signoria, in Florence, this open air museum was beautiful in the morning as light spilled down and over the statues and general gorgeousness that is Florence. — Afar Magazine

The loggia was constructed at the end of the 14C to accommodate the members of the Florentine government (the Signoria) during official ceremonies — Michelin Guide

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