Reykjavik

Showing 35 attractions
9
5 reviews
Viking treasures and artifacts, silver work, wood carvings, and some unusual whalebone carvings are on display. — Fodor's
9
Miõborg
6 reviews
Also known as Hafnarhús, this former warehouse of the Port of Reykjavík now houses the city's art museum. — Fodor's
9
Miõborg
6 reviews
You can’t miss Hallgrimskirkja, Reykjavik’s 73-metre-tall, rocket-shaped church, which soars above the city skyline and is illuminated at night — Afar Magazine
8
4 reviews
Head to the fifth floor to see the diagonal glass staircase also designed by Eliasson, or walk around to the back for unobstructed views of the waterfront and the ferries going out to Videy Island. — Condé Nast Traveler
8
4 reviews
Housed in an old fish factory with great views of the harbor, the maritime museum features an exhibition on Icelandic fisheries, trading vessels, and displays a whole Coastal Guard vessel which can be explored. — Fodor's
8
Miõborg
4 reviews
The oldest known evidence of human habitation in Reykjavík, dating from 871. — Frommer's
8
5 reviews
Learn more about Iceland's history by exploring Árbær, a onetime working farm turned faithfully re-created village, complete with farm animals, simple wooden houses, a town square. — Condé Nast Traveler
8
Laugardalur
3 reviews
The park is a favourite with locals for its huge swimming complex, fed by the geothermal spring. — Lonely Planet
8
3 reviews
There’s something immensely playful about Ásmundur Sveinsson’s (1893–1982) vast collection of sculptures housed in the studio and museum he designed: the rounded, white Ásmundarsafn. — Lonely Planet
8
3 reviews
As well as Kjarval's key works there's also a rotation of temporary exhibitions, featuring the works of both local and international artists. Entrance is free with the Reykjavík City Card. — Fodor's
8
4 reviews
The largest whale exhibition in Europe, this museum opened on the western harbor in 2014. — Frommer's
7
Miõborg
2 reviews
This pretty stack of marble atriums and spacious galleries overlooking Tjörnin offers ever-changing exhibits drawn from the 10,000-piece collection. — Lonely Planet
7
3 reviews
This futuristic glass dome, built in 1991, sits atop five enormous cylindrical tanks storing 24,000 tons of the city's geothermally heated water. — Frommer's
7
Miõborg
3 reviews
Reykjavík’s waterside Ráðhús is a beautifully positioned postmodern construction of concrete stilts, tinted windows and mossy walls rising from Tjörnin. — Lonely Planet
7
3 reviews
Learn about the classical tales explaining the Northern Lights, and the scientific explanation, then watch a 35-minute surround-sound panoramic HD recreation of Icelandic auroras. — Lonely Planet
7
3 reviews
The endearingly bloodthirsty Saga Museum is where Icelandic history is brought to life by eerie silicon models and a multi-language soundtrack with thudding axes and hair-raising screams. — Lonely Planet
7
Miõborg
3 reviews
This natural pond by the City Hall attracts birds—and bird lovers—year-round, and is also popular among ice-skaters in winter — Fodor's
7
Miõborg
2 reviews
An encyclopedic collection of mammal penises.  — Atlas Obscura
7
Miõborg
2 reviews
Go for the facade, but stay for the events: the Iceland Airwaves festival starts October 31; last year’s lineup featured Bjork and Yoko Ono, among others. — Afar Magazine
7
Miõborg
2 reviews
Designed to resemble the basalt lava that flows in Iceland, the church looks like a strong upside-down V made of tall, thin white beams. — Condé Nast Traveler
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