=

Buenos Aires

95 expert recommended attractions

Filter results

Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes

Recoleta 97 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The world's largest collection of Argentine art is displayed in this huge golden-color stone building. — Fodor's

Old-world masters like Rubens and Picasso are well represented, but the best part of the museum is the Argentinean art—the most extensive collection anywhere. — Travel + Leisure

This is Argentina’s most important national arts museum and contains many key works by Benito Quinquela Martín, Xul Solar, Edwardo Sívori and other Argentine artists. — Lonely Planet

The MNBA is home to 32 rooms, sculpture patios, an architecture display, studios, a library and an auditorium. — Time Out

This building, which formerly pumped the city's water supply, metamorphosed into Buenos Aires's most important art museum in 1930. — Frommer's

Teatro Colon

San Nicolas 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Pavarotti, Nureyev, and Pavlova have performed at this opera house, which is both acoustically and visually staggering — Travel + Leisure

Teatro Colón is considered one of the most beautiful theaters in the world. — Afar Magazine

Buenos Aires's golden age of prosperity gave birth to this luxurious opera house. — Frommer's

With its regular lines and tempered classicism, the Colón is one of Buenos Aires' key architectural as well as cultural landmarks. — Time Out

One of the best operahouses in the world, and has exceptional acoustic qualities. — Michelin Guide

Plaza de Mayo

Montserrat 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Plaza de Mayo remains the political heart of Buenos Aires, serving as a forum for protests with many camping out here overnight. — Frommer's

The Plaza de Mayo, dominated by the Pirámide de Mayo (1811) commemorating the revolution, is the backdrop for every kind of meeting, both public and official. — Michelin Guide

The plaza remains the traditional site for ceremonies, rallies, and protests. The balcony facing Plaza de Mayo is a presidential podium. — Fodor's

Plaza de Mayo is located in the center of downtown Buenos Aires and is the focal point of political life in the city. — Afar Magazine

Planted between the Casa Rosada, the Cabildo and the city’s main cathedral, grassy Plaza de Mayo is BA’s ground zero for the city’s most vehement protests. — Lonely Planet

Palacio Barolo

Montserrat 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A tower devoted to — and modeled after — the Divine Comedy.  — Atlas Obscura

This recentlry resotred structure became the city's first skyscraper when it opened in 1923. A tour of the Art Nouveau-inspired building offers some of the best views of the skyline. — Travel + Leisure

One of the city's most emblematic buildings, this 1923 construction is a neo-gothic allegorical tribute to the 100 cantos of Dante's Divine Comedy. — Time Out

One of the Congreso area’s most striking buildings is this 22-story concrete edifice. — Lonely Planet

Among the most impressive buildings in Buenos Aires, and once the tallest in South America, this oddly decorated building with a central tower is a showstopper. — Frommer's

Recoleta Cemetery

Recoleta 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

La Recoleta Cemetery is one of the most visited cemeteries in Latin America, mainly because Evita Peron is buried there, among other notable figures. — Afar Magazine

With more than 4,700 ornate stone crypts laid out along a streetlike grid, this graveyard is an architectural masterpiece, and an eerie miniature city for the wealthy dead. — Travel + Leisure

A who's who of Argentinean bold-faced names rests among Recoleta Cemetery's tombs and mausoleums, from the Alvears and the Dorregos to heavyweight boxer Luis Ángel Firpo. — Concierge

Open daily from 8am to 6pm, this is the final resting place of many of the wealthiest and most important Argentine historical figures. — Frommer's

The cemetery, opened in 1822, is home to hundreds of illustrious corpses, laid out in a compact yet very extensive maze of granite, marble and bronze mausoleums. — Time Out

Museo Evita

Palermo 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Great controversy still surrounds the life of Eva Duarte, who rose from humble beginnings to become a star actress and wife of the populist dictator Juan Perón. — Concierge

Museo Evita immortalizes the Argentine heroine with plenty of videos, historical photos, books, old posters and newspaper headlines. — Lonely Planet

Photos, films and accounts give an interesting insight into the life this Argentine icon who worked to help the disadvantaged and created the foundation where the collections are exhibited. — Michelin Guide

The Museo Evita shies from pop culture clichés and conveys facts about Evita's life and works, particularly the social aid programs she instituted and her role in getting women the vote. — Fodor's

Opened in 2001, this museum is housed in an aristocratic residence that Juan Perón expropriated; he converted it into a women's shelter for his wife's quasi-statal welfare agency. — Time Out

Museum of Latin American Art of Buenos Aires

Palermo 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The fabulous Museum of Latin American Art of Buenos Aires (MALBA) is one of the cornerstones of the city's cultural life. — Fodor's

Sparkling inside its glass walls, this airy modern arts museum is one of BA’s fanciest. — Lonely Planet

This sleek modernist slab on the edge of Palermo Chico—the choice address of B.A.'s television personalities and diplomats—was designed by a triumvirate of young Argentinean architects. — Concierge

Achieves its goal of showcasing 20C Latin-American art, thanks to a rich permanent collection. — Michelin Guide

Opened in 2001 as a sort of personal art museum of Argentine über–real estate developer Eduardo Costantini, MALBA... now plays a central role in Buenos Aires’s artistic and cultural life. — Travel + Leisure

  • 6
  • 2
  • 14
  • 11
  • 12

El Zanjon de Granados

San Telmo 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

One of the more unique places in BA is this amazing urban architectural site. — Lonely Planet

A fascinating place to visit. — Michelin Guide

Historic in architectural form, this museum and event space is housed in a 178-year-old mansion–turned–boarding house that once sat atop the city’s earliest sewer system. — Travel + Leisure

The street it's on was once a small river—the zanjón, or gorge, of the property's name—where the first, unsuccessful attempt to found Buenos Aires took place in 1536. — Fodor's

Part archaeological museum, part event space, El Zanjón is a beautifully restored residence encapsulating three centuries of urban living. — Time Out

Parque 3 de Febrero

Palermo 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Known locally as Los Bosques de Palermo (Palermo Woods), this 200-acre green space is really a crazy quilt of smaller parks. — Fodor's

The largest park in the city. — Michelin Guide

Today, it is one of the cities most vibrant green spaces, known for its rose garden and it Moderniste gate (one of the few pieces of Modernist architecture in the city). — Frommer's

Also known as Bosques de Palermo, or Palermo Woods, this sweeping green space abounds with small lakes and paddleboats, pretty gazeboes, stands renting bikes and in-line skates. — Lonely Planet

This beautiful park—with its Rosedal rose garden and a delicate white wooden bridge crossing a figure-eight lake—serves as ground zero for sun-loving Argentines on weekend strolls. — Travel + Leisure

  • 6
  • 11
  • 1
  • 2
  • 12

Museo Nacional De Arte Decorativo

Palermo 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The harmonious, French neoclassical mansion that houses the National Museum of Decorative Art is as much a reason to visit as the period furnishings, porcelain, and silver within it. — Fodor's

This museum is housed in the stunning beaux arts mansion called Residencia Errázuriz Alvear (1917), once the residence of Chilean aristocrat Matías Errázuriz and his wife, Josefina de Alvear. — Lonely Planet

Still, there are scores of interesting pieces among the 4,000 on show, including sculptures by Rodin, paintings by El Greco and fine porcelain from France and the Far East. — Travel + Leisure

Since 1937, this stunning neoclassical mansion, formerly the Palacio Errázuriz, has operated as a museum devoted to the decorative arts. — Concierge

This stunning building was converted into a museum in 1937, and its majestic ballrooms, bedrooms and hallways today display over 4,000 pieces of decorative art. — Time Out

Jardin Botanico

Palermo 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Buenos Aires Botanical Garden has plants from Argentina and abroad, aromatic and endemic species, flowering plants... as well as fountains and sculptures. — Michelin Guide

This welcoming green haven, built by the prolific French-Argentine landscape architect Carlos Thays in 1898, is an ideal place for a Sunday-afternoon ramble. — Concierge

Escape the din of Plaza Italia inside this lush botanical garden, designed by renowned landscape architect Carlos Thays and opened in 1898. — Lonely Planet

A surprisingly tranquil haven nestled between two avenues in bustling Palermo, it's also an unofficial home for dozens of unwanted but extremely friendly cats. — Travel + Leisure

With 18 acres of gardens and 5,500 varieties of exotic and local flora, the Carlos Thays Botanical Garden is an unexpected green haven wedged between three busy Palermo streets. — Fodor's

La Manzana de Las Luces

Montserrat 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The 'Block of Enlightenment' is a complex of historical buildings that occupies an entire city block (manzana can mean 'block' as well as 'apple'). — Time Out

A Gateway to an Underground Tunnel Network.  — Atlas Obscura

More history is packed into this single block of buildings southwest of Plaza de Mayo than in scores of other city blocks put together. — Fodor's

In colonial times, the Manzana de las Luces was Buenos Aires’ most important center of culture and learning. — Lonely Planet

Argentina's best-known intellectuals have gathered and studied here, and the name "block of lights" honors the school's graduates. — Frommer's

Calle Museo Caminito

La Boca 86 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

These days it's painfully commercial, and seems more a parody of porteño culture than anything else, but if you're willing to embrace the out-and-out tackiness it can make a fun outing. — Fodor's

A bright little alley in La Boca is a part of tango history.  — Atlas Obscura

The open-air tchotchke market and boisterous tango zone that operates along the colorful, scimitar-shaped byway known as Caminito is the city's only outdoor museum. — Concierge

This is the main attraction in La Boca, Buenos Aires's original Little Italy. — Frommer's

La Boca's most famous street and 'open air' museum is a magnet for visitors, who come to see its brightly painted houses and snap photographs of the figures of Juan and Evita Perón. — Lonely Planet

Reserva Ecologica

Puerto Madero 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The 865-acre Ecological Reserve was built over a landfill, and is home to more than 500 species of birds and a variety of flora and fauna. — Fodor's

The reserve is the kind of place where you're likely to encounter some of its 200 bird species and a handful of lizards sharing their habitat with joggers, bikers, and picnicking weekenders. — Concierge

Within this nature reserve's boundaries, four lakes, giant cortaderias (foxtail pampas grass), willows and shrubs provide natural habitats for more than 200 bird species. — Time Out

The Ecological Reserve is an unusual and unexpected consequence of highway construction throughout Buenos Aires during the mid-20th century. — Frommer's

The beautifully marshy land of this 350-hectare nature reserve has become a popular site for weekend picnics and walks. — Lonely Planet

Plaza Dorrego

San Telmo 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

After Plaza de Mayo, Plaza Dorrego is the city's oldest plaza. It dates to the 18th century and was originally a pit stop for caravans bringing supplies into BA from around Argentina. — Lonely Planet

Originally the site of a Bethlehemite monastery, this plaza, the second-oldest square in the city, is where Argentines met to reconfirm their declaration of independence from Spain. — Frommer's

The heart of San Telmo, formerly the playground of B.A.'s 19th-century elite, is this Spanish-style plaza, the site of several busy open-air cafés. — Concierge

During the week a handful of craftspeople and a few scruffy pigeons are the only ones enjoying the shade from the stately trees in the city's second-oldest square. — Fodor's

On Sundays it seems like the entire population of Buenos Aires flocks to San Telmo, a newly chic boho district. Start at Plaza Dorego then fan out to the various antiques centers, which... — Travel + Leisure

  • 2
  • 1
  • 14
  • 6
  • 12

San Telmo

San Telmo 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The streets surrounding the Plaza Dorrego are filled with vendors selling art, antiques and souvenirs. — Afar Magazine

A masterpiece not just for its soaring wrought-iron interior, but for the atmosphere you'll find here. — Frommer's

Depending on the visitor, either a lovably bohemian neighborhood of art galleries and ancient homes or a grungy neighborhood of overpriced tchotchkes. — Travel + Leisure

It is a lively neighbourhood, that comes into its own on Sundays,. — Michelin Guide

  • 55
  • 1
  • 12
  • 11

El Museo Casa Carlos Gardel

Buenos Aires 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Carlos Gardel, the preeminent Argentine tango singer whose portraits you see all over the city and who is nicknamed Carlitos, bought this house in 1927 for his mother. — Frommer's

A long overdue tribute to one of the 20th century's greatest exponents of popular song, the Gardel museum preserves and exhibits various items and pieces of memorabilia. — Time Out

Small but noteworthy is this tribute to tango's most famous voice. — Lonely Planet

Hard-core tango fans shouldn't pass up a quick visit to the home of tango's greatest hero, Carlos Gardel. — Fodor's

Dip into the life of tango's most legendary singer, El Zorzal (the thrush) Carlos Gardel, whose life was tragically cut short in a plane crash when he was 45. — Travel + Leisure

  • 1
  • 9
  • 2
  • 6
  • 12

Museo de la Pasion Boquense

La Boca 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Inside Estadio Boca Juniors (aka La Bombonera), this modern, two-floor museum is heaven for fútbol fans. — Fodor's

Stop by this museum adjacent to La Bombonera stadium for all things Boca Juniors. — Time Out

High-tech and spiffy, this fútbol (soccer) museum chronicles the rough-and-tumble neighborhood of La Boca. — Lonely Planet

Attached to La Bombonera, legendary home ground of Boca Juniors soccer club, this loud and garish museum traces the team’s (mostly) glorious history. — Travel + Leisure

This is the home of the fútbol (soccer) club Boca Juniors, the team of Argentine legend Diego Maradona, who, like his country, went from glory to fiery collapse (and revival) rather quickly. — Frommer's

  • 6
  • 9
  • 2
  • 12
  • 1

Museo de Arte Hispanoamericano Isaac Fernandez Blanco

Retiro 82 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A superb collection of Hispanic art dating back to the eighteenth century, religious objects, silverware, and furniture. — Frommer's

This museum is in an old mansion of the neocolonial Peruvian style that developed as a reaction against French influences in turn-of-the-19th-century Argentine architecture. — Lonely Planet

Splendid collections of the Isaac Fernández Blanco Museum of Hispanic-American Art are embellished by the neo-colonial Palacio Noel. — Michelin Guide

The distinctive Peruvian neocolonial-style Palacio Noel serves as the perfect backdrop for this colonial art and craft museum. — Fodor's

  • 1
  • 2
  • 11
  • 6

Puerto Madero

Puerto Madero 81 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This renovated docklands area is lined with pleasant pedestrian walkways, expensive lofts, trendy restaurants and bars and some of the city’s priciest hotels. — Lonely Planet

A great place to take a quiet stroll and walk along the river. — Afar Magazine

Puerto Madero, now a business quarter and haunt of trendy bohos, is also a place for a stroll, a picnic, or lunch on a restaurant terrace. — Michelin Guide

It's still shocking to many porteños that Puerto Madero—once a run-down dock area—has now surpassed Recoleta as B.A.'s highest-rent district. — Concierge

Beautifully revamped, this once-derelict two-mile stretch of docks and warehouses is now lined with steak houses, nightclubs, and romantic arching streetlights. — Travel + Leisure

  • 2
  • 55
  • 11
  • 14
  • 12
Back to Search Results

Filters  

  • Museums
    27 museums and galleries
  • Outdoors
    14 parks, gardens and outdoor attractions
  • Historical
    12 places of historical interest

or use your email address:

Register Login

Already have an account?

Log in →
Forgot password?

Don't have an account yet?

Register →