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Paris

264 expert recommended attractions

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Musee du Louvre

Louvre / Palais-Royal 95 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The museum is a never-ending labyrinth with thousands of art collections, paintings, sculptures from all time periods and varying art genres. — Afar Magazine

The most recognized symbol of Paris is the Tour Eiffel, but the ultimate traveler's prize is the Louvre. — Fodor's

The world's most famous museum, originally a royal residence, usually elicits one of two strong reactions from those who've never been before—exhilaration or dread. — Concierge

For eight centuries, the Louvre was the residence of kings and emperors. Successive expansion projects have created one of the world's largest palaces, along with the Vatican. — Michelin Guide

The world's largest museum is also its most visited, with an incredible 8.8 million visitors in 2011. — Time Out

Musee d'Orsay

Tour Eiffel / Invalides 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Since opening in 1986, the Musée d'Orsay has become one of the most successful and beloved museums in the world. — Concierge

The Orsay boasts an astounding collection devoted to the watershed years 1848 to 1914, with a treasure-trove by the big names plus all the lesser-known groups. — Frommer's

Originally a train station, the museum is fairly large and is best seen over several visits so you don’t become art-ed out. — Let's Go

Since 1986, the huge main hall of the former Orsay railway station has been the home of art collections covering the period 1848 to 1914. — Michelin Guide

Top of every visitor’s must-see list is the museum’s painting collections, centred on the world’s largest collection of impressionist and postimpressionist art. — Lonely Planet

Arc de Triomphe

Champs-Elysees 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The Arc de Triomphe is the city's second most iconic monument after the Eiffel Tower - older, shorter, but far more symbolically important. — Time Out

This colossal, 164-foot triumphal arch was ordered by Napoléon to celebrate his military successes. — Fodor's

Located at the western end of the Champs-Élysées, the Arc de Triomphe was inspired by Rome's Arch of Titus and commissioned by Napoleon in 1806. — Afar Magazine

Situated at the top of the Champs-Élysées, this arch occupies the centre of the Place Charles-de-Gaulle, which opens out onto 12 wide avenues. — Michelin Guide

At the western end of the Champs-Élysées, the Arc de Triomphe suggests an ancient Roman arch, only it's larger. — Frommer's

Centre Pompidou

Les Halles 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Located in the center of Paris in a building designed by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, Centre Pompidou is the brainchild of President Georges Pompidou. — Travel + Leisure

When it first opened in the 1970s, the Centre Pompidou was hailed as "the most avant-garde building in the world," and today it still continues to pack in the art-loving crowds... — Frommer's

This postmodern building revolutionized the world of architecture—and turned the rarified concept of a museum into something that could be unintimidating and fun. — goop

Paris’ premier cultural centre has amazed visitors since it was inaugurated in 1977. — Lonely Planet

Designed by the architects Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano, the Pompidou Centre is located in the old Beaubourg quarter. — Michelin Guide

Notre Dame Cathedral

Ile de la Cite / Ile Saint-Louis 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This site has been a place of worship for 2,000 years: a Gallo-Roman temple, Christian basilica and Romanesque church all preceded the current building. — Michelin Guide

Paris' most visited unticketed site with upwards of 14 million visitors... a year, is a masterpiece of French Gothic architecture. — Lonely Planet

This great Gothic masterpiece ranks among the most moving and important Christian sites in the world. — Concierge

Although it's one of Paris's most consistently popular tourist sites, this Gothic cathedral still has the power to stun. — Condé Nast Traveler

Seen from a distance, the mismatched spires and dazzling silhouette of Chartres cathedral burst out of the Beauce cornfields and dominate the skyline... — Time Out

Sainte-Chapelle

Ile de la Cite / Ile Saint-Louis 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The Lower Chapel has a blue, vaulted ceiling dotted with the golden symbol of the French monarchy, the fleurs-de-lis, and contains a few “treasures” (i.e., platter-sized portraits of saints). — Let's Go

Jewel of Gothic architecture of the XIII century, exceptional. — Not For Tourists

This jewel of Gothic art was built upon the order of Saint Louis to house the relics of Christ and the Virgin Mary. — Michelin Guide

Countless writers have called this tiny chapel a jewel box, yet that hardly suffices. — Frommer's

Devout King Louis IX (St Louis, 1226-70) had a hobby of accumulating holy relics. — Time Out

Pere-Lachaise Cemetery

Belleville / Pere Lachaise 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This cemetery is the largest in Paris. The uneven ground and the abundant willows, maples and cypress mitigate the funerary character of the place. — Michelin Guide

Beautiful and quiet place. Very quiet... — Not For Tourists

The world’s most visited cemetery, Père Lachaise (named after a confessor of Louis XIV) opened its one-way doors in 1804. — Lonely Planet

Bring a red rose for "the Little Sparrow" Edith Piaf when you visit the cobblestone avenues and towering trees that make this 118-acre oasis of green perhaps the world's most famous cemetery. — Fodor's

First of all, it’s not creepy. An oasis of peace in Charonne, the tombs of La Cimetière du Père-Lachaise bear the names of major figures in literature, theatre, and music. — On the Grid

Musee Carnavalet

Le Marais 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The first museum you should go to in Paris is this superb 140-room collection dedicated to the history of the city itself. — Concierge

A museum on the history of Paris, including a set of Napoleon's toiletries, Proust's room, and relics of the Revolution.  — Atlas Obscura

This enormous museum, subtitled Histoire de Paris (History of Paris), is housed in two hôtels particuliers. — Lonely Planet

Housed in two 16th century mansions, the Carnavalet Museum details Paris's history back to its earliest Neolithic roots. — Travel + Leisure

A mammoth’s molar; the chair in which Volatire died; Robespierre’s shaving dish. — Condé Nast Traveler

Place des Vosges

Le Marais 91 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Paris’s oldest and perhaps snootiest public square has served many generations of residents, from the knights who clashed swords in medieval tournaments to the hipsters who tan and swap bottles. — Let's Go

The exquisite Place des Vosges was built by Henri IV and inaugurated in 1612 to celebrate the wedding of Louis XIII to Anne of Austria. — Frommer's

Inaugurated in 1612 as place Royale and thus the oldest square in Paris, place des Vosges is a strikingly elegant ensemble of 36 symmetrical houses with ground-floor arcades. — Lonely Planet

This vast square, probably conceived by Métezeau, was the wish of Henri IV. When completed in 1612, the Place Royale became the centre of elegant life, with carrousels and pleasure. — Michelin Guide

The oldest square in Paris and—dare we say it?—the most beautiful, the Place des Vosges represents an early stab at urban planning. — Fodor's

Palais Garnier - Opera National de Paris

Opera / Bourse 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

During the renovations of Paris in the late 1800s, few monuments constructed could equal the grandeur of the palatial Opera Garnier. — Travel + Leisure

Designed in 1860 by Charles Garnier, the sumptuous façade of this opera house is adorned with numerous sculptures. — Michelin Guide

For a unique, behind-the-scenes visit, luxury concierge Your Paris Experience can arrange a tour of the rehearsal room where the dancers stretch and warm up before performances. — Departures

Awash with marble, sculpture, gilding and paintings, Paris's glamorous opera house, designed by Charles Garnier 1860-75, is a fascinating vision of how the Bonapartes reinvented themselves as monarchy — The Telegraph

Haunt of the Phantom of the Opera and the real-life inspiration for Edgar Degas's dancer paintings, the gorgeous Opéra Garnier is one of two homes of the National Opera of Paris. — Fodor's

Musee Rodin

Tour Eiffel / Invalides 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

One of the most peaceful places in central Paris and a wonderful spot to contemplate his famous work The Thinker. — Lonely Planet

Rodin's powerful bronze and stone sculptures would be stunning even if they were displayed in a parking lot, but here, they're housed in a 1728 private mansion. — Concierge

In the Hôtel Biron, the most expressive works by Rodin are displayed in rooms with fine wood panelling. — Michelin Guide

My wife and two friends were tired of "museums" so they mistakenly decided to go shopping while I went to the Rodin Museum alone. It was breathtaking, the flowers were all in full bloom,... — Afar Magazine

The stately Hôtel Biron, built in 1732, has been home to Musée Rodin since 1919. — Condé Nast Traveler

Eiffel Tower

Tour Eiffel / Invalides 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

It's hard to imagine just how avant-garde this tower of cast-iron girders was when it was built in 1889 to celebrate the World's Fair and the centenary of the French Revolution. — Concierge

This is the monument we all think we know and yet, when you actually see the real thing, there's still something astonishing about the metal structure. — The Telegraph

The Eiffel Tower is to Paris what the Statue of Liberty is to New York and what Big Ben is London: the ultimate civic emblem. — Fodor's

No building better symbolises Paris than the Tour Eiffel. — Time Out

No one could imagine Paris today without its signature spire. — Lonely Planet

Musee du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac

Tour Eiffel / Invalides 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This time machine/museum of natural history will shower you with its theatricality. — Let's Go

Quai Branly is a provocative architectural and cultural statement, and the city's latest must-see. — Concierge

During these days the museum is holding a Maori exposition. This artifact, that resembles a spy aircraft, is supposed to improve the crops by its power over climate (well, at least that... — Afar Magazine

Exhibits mix artifacts from antiquity to the modern age, such as funeral masks from Melanesia, Siberian shaman drums, Indonesian textiles, and African statuary. — Fodor's

Pieces are presented according to their geographical zone of origin: Oceania, America, Africa and Asia. — Michelin Guide

Musee de Cluny - Musee National du Moyen Age

Quartier Latin 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Built on the ruins of Roman baths, the Hôtel de Cluny has been a museum since medievalist Alexandre Du Sommerard established his collection here in 1844. — Fodor's

Medieval museum built over Roman baths that features famous tapestries of a lady and a unicorn.  — Atlas Obscura

Along with the Hôtel de Sens in the Marais, the Hôtel de Cluny is all that remains of domestic medieval architecture in Paris. — Frommer's

The best museums in Paris awe with beauty or provide a deepened understanding of the city. The Musée National du Moyen Age (also known as the Musée de Cluny) does both. — Concierge

Inside, spectacular displays include statuary, illuminated manuscripts, weapons, furnishings and objets d’art made of gold, ivory and enamel. — Lonely Planet

Musee Marmottan

Passy 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Containing collections from the Renaissance and the Napoleonic era, which have been enriched by a number of donations of impressionist works, in particular by Claude Monet. — Michelin Guide

A few years ago the underrated Marmottan tacked "Monet" onto its official name—and justly so, as this is the largest collection of the artist's works anywhere. — Fodor's

Monet lovers could now trace the evolution of the great man's work in a single museum. — Frommer's

Only in Paris could the world's single largest collection of Monet paintings (along with works by Pissarro, Sisley, and Renoir) be overshadowed by other museums. — Concierge

This museum, two blocks east of the Bois de Boulogne between Porte de la Muette and Porte de Passy, has the world’s largest collection of works by impressionist painter Claude Monet. — Lonely Planet

Sacré-Cœur Basilica

Montmartre 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Sacré-Coeur is one of Paris's most characteristic landmarks and has been the subject of much controversy. One Parisian called it "a lunatic's confectionery dream". — Frommer's

It's hard to not feel as though you're climbing up to heaven when you visit Sacred Heart Basilica, the white castle in the sky, perched atop Montmartre. — Fodor's

Sacred Heart Basilica was built from contributions pledged by Parisian Catholics as an act of contrition after the humiliating Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71. — Lonely Planet

After the catastrophe of 1870, a number of Catholics vowed to build a church consecrated to the Heart of Christ on the hill of Montmartre. — Michelin Guide

If you choose to approach the church from below, it's around 100 steps, and if you want to climb up into the dome, it's another 270. Your reward for all that exercise is a stunning view of Paris. — Afar Magazine

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Musee Picasso Paris

Le Marais 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

More than 5,000 pieces by Pablo Picasso are part of this museum's collection. A recent renovation expanded the museum by about double the size. — Condé Nast Traveler

Housed in the stunning Hôtel Salé, a 17th-century mansion, this unique institution valliantly strives to make sense of the incredibly diverse output of this prolific genius. — Frommer's

The collection of more than 100,000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, documents, and other archival materials... spans the artist's entire career. — Fodor's

The 17C Hôtel Salé is the setting for this impressive collection of paintings which follows the development of this great master from Málaga in southern Spain. — Michelin Guide

One of Paris’ most beloved art collections opened its doors again after massive renovation works in summer 2013. — Lonely Planet

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Musee National des Arts Asiatiques - Guimet

Trocadero 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The outstanding Musée Guimet boasts the western world's biggest collection of Asian art, thanks to the 19th-century wanderings of Lyonnaise industrialist Émile Guimet. — Fodor's

France’s foremost Asian art museum has a superb collection of sculptures, paintings and religious articles that originated in the vast stretch of land between Afghanistan and Japan. — Lonely Planet

This is one of the most beautiful Asian museums in the world, and it houses one of the world's finest collections of Asian art. — Frommer's

The «Louvre of Oriental Art» is how the Guimet Museum has been described. It has probably the world's collection of Asiatic art. — Michelin Guide

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Musee Jacquemart-Andre

Paris 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This sumptuous residence built in 1875 for the banker Edouard André houses the collection he made with his wife, Nélie Jacquemart, a painter. — Michelin Guide

This is the finest museum of its type in Paris... devoted to 18th-century French paintings and furnishings, 17th-century Dutch and Flemish paintings, and Italian Renaissance works. — Frommer's

The Jacquemart-André Museum, founded by collector Édouard André and his portraitist wife Nélie Jacquemart, is in an opulent mid-19th-century residence on one of Paris’ posher avenues. — Lonely Planet

Perhaps the city's best small museum, the opulent Musée Jacquemart-André is home to a huge collection of art and furnishings lovingly assembled in the late 19th century. — Fodor's

This public museum, just a 15-minute walk from the Arc de Triomphe, was once the home of art collector Édouard André and his wife, painter Nélie Jacquemart. — Travel + Leisure

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The Catacombs

Montparnasse 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This is just the thing for anyone with morbid interests. — Fodor's

The underground of the three Parisian mounts (Montparnasse, Montrouge, Montsouris) has been exploited since Gallo-Roman times. — Michelin Guide

Paris’ most gruesome and macabre sight is its series of underground tunnels lined with skulls and bones exhumed from the city’s overflowing cemeteries. — Lonely Planet

The creepy Paris Catacombs is an underground labyrinth stocking the remains of about six million Parisians, removed from cemeteries at the end of the 18th century. — Travel + Leisure

Every year, about 50,000 visitors explore some 910m (2,986 ft.) of tunnel in these dank catacombs to look at six million ghoulishly arranged, skull-and-crossbones skeletons. — Frommer's

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