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Portland

69 expert recommended attractions

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International Rose Test Garden

Southwest Portland 95 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

These are among the largest and oldest rose test gardens in the United States and are the only city-maintained test gardens to bestow awards on every year's best roses. — Frommer's

Stunning International Rose Test Garden is stocked full of some 7,000 varieties beautiful blooms from around the world. — Condé Nast Traveler

These gardens practically gave Portland its 'Rose City' nickname. — Lonely Planet

Sniff 500 varieties of roses that are being developed and evaluated for scent and color and can't be seen anywhere else in the world. — Travel + Leisure

Yes it's gaudy, but locals secretly love it. — Not For Tourists

Forest Park

Northwest District 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Aptly named park. Great for picnics, sasquatch hunting. — Not For Tourists

Not many cities have 5100 acres of temperature rainforest within their limits, but then not many cities are like Portland. — Lonely Planet

One of the nation's largest urban wildernesses (5,000 acres), this city-owned, car-free park, has more than 50 species of birds and mammals and more than 70 miles of trails. — Fodor's

One of the largest urban parks in North America, this forest is part of a 9,000-acre park system that forms a wildlife corridor to the Coast Range. — Frommer's

New Yorkers have Central Park, and Portlanders have Forest Park, a sprawling 5,100-acre wilderness that’s a short walk from the shops and restaurants of Northwest 23rd Street. — Condé Nast Traveler

Tom McCall Waterfront Park

Northwest District 91 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The park starts at the Broadway Bridge, stretches south for about 2 miles and then converts into a portion of the Greenway, a path continuing south to Willamette Park. — Where

This grassy, 23-acre park that stretches for about 1 1/2 miles along the Willamette River was once Portland’s raucous river port. — Frommer's

This park used to be a highway. Portland traded up. — Not For Tourists

Affords a fine ground-level view of downtown Portland's bridges and skyline. Once an expressway, it's now the site for many annual celebrations, among them the Rose Festival. — Fodor's

The grassy 23-acre park that now stretches for about 1.5mi along the Willamette River was once Portland's raucous river port. — Michelin Guide

Portland Japanese Garden

Southwest Portland 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This tranquil, formal garden is made up of 5.5 acres of tumbling water, koi ponds, ornamental cherry trees, a ceremonial teahouse (no drinks served!) and a sand garden. — Lonely Planet

Considered the finest example of a Japanese garden in North America, this exquisitely manicured green space should not be missed. — Frommer's

One of the most authentic Japanese gardens outside of Japan occupies a 5.5-acre site directly above the rose gardens. — Michelin Guide

There's more to Japan than ninjas and sushi, you know. — Not For Tourists

Five gardens—Flat, Strolling Pond, Natural, Tea, and Sand & Stone—span 5.5 acres of this Japanese garden located near the Rose Gardens in Washington Park. — Travel + Leisure

Oregon Zoo

Southwest Portland 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The Oregon Zoo has evolved from a hodgepodge of animals kept at the back of a pharmacy into a worldclass research facility, offering a constantly changing mix of exhibits and other amusements — Where

You'll laugh. You'll cry. Beware a particularly randy sea otter. — Not For Tourists

The state's most visited attraction, the Oregon Zoo is home to over 1,000 animals representing 200 species of birds, mammals reptiles and amphibians, including 54 that are threatened or endangered. — Michelin Guide

The Oregon Zoo is perhaps best known for its elephants and has the most successful breeding herd of elephants in captivity. — Frommer's

This beautiful animal park in the West Hills is famous for its Asian elephants. Major exhibits include an African section with rhinos, hippos, zebras, and giraffes. — Fodor's

Lan Su Chinese Garden

Downtown 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This 2000 addition to Portland's small international district is a highly stylized retreat whose high-walled courtyards, pools, walkways and meditation rooms are designed to mute the bustle outside. — Michelin Guide

This classically styled Chinese garden takes up an entire city block and is the largest of its type outside of China. — Frommer's

Stroll through the Pearl District and Old Town Chinatown to reach Lan Su Chinese Garden, a pristinely preened Japanese garden built in 1999 by denizens of Portland’s sister city of Suzhou, China. — Condé Nast Traveler

It's the largest Suzhou-style garden outside China, with a large lake, bridged and covered walkways, koi- and water lily–filled ponds... waterfalls, and courtyards. — Fodor's

Kind of like China! (Except without the smog and communism...). — Not For Tourists

Pioneer Courthouse Square

Downtown 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Spend any time in Pioneer Courthouse Square and you'll find that it's ground zero for the alternative lifestyle embraced by the city. — Travel + Leisure

Lined with 12 monumental terra-cotta-faced columns with rose capitals, the plaza has a limestone-faced fountain projecting from its west end and a curving amphitheater on its south side. — Michelin Guide

The heart of downtown Portland, this brick plaza is nicknamed 'Portland's living room' and is the most visited public space in the city. — Lonely Planet

Portland's living room. Sit down a bit. Unless it's raining. — Not For Tourists

The brick-paved square is an outdoor stage for everything from summer outdoor movies to food festivals to flower displays to concerts. — Frommer's

Portland Art Museum

Downtown 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This is the oldest art museum in the Northwest, and it has an excellent collection of modern and contemporary art. — Frommer's

The treasures at the Pacific Northwest's oldest arts facility span 35 centuries of Asian, European, and American art. — Fodor's

Now one of the 25 largest museums in the United States, the Portland Art Museum has a collection of more than 32,000 works of art from American Indian artifacts to Monet’s Waterlilies. — Where

The permanent collection includes a range of contemporary, Native American, and European art. — Concierge

Since the construction in 2005 of a new wing, the Pacific Northwest’s oldest art museum has really become two facilities in one. — Travel + Leisure

Portland Saturday Market

Downtown 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The best time to hit the river walk is on a weekend to catch the famous market, which showcases handicrafts, street entertainers and food booths. — Lonely Planet

Old Town is liveliest on weekends from March to December when hundreds of people descend on the Portland Saturday Market, billing itself the largest outdoor crafts market in the US. — Michelin Guide

On weekends from March to Christmas, the west side of the Burnside Bridge and the Skidmore Fountain area has North America's largest open-air handicraft market. — Fodor's

On Saturdays, the nation’s largest ongoing outdoor arts and crafts market unfolds. — Travel + Leisure

It lived up to its hype! I spent a few hours Saturday morning wandering around the market and was floored at the talent of the vendors. — Afar Magazine

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry

Southeast Portland 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

OMSI is a hands-on museum where visitors, especially children, are encouraged to touch things, try experiments and question why things happen. — Where

For obvious reasons, the Oregon Museum of Science & Industry is a kid’s dream: planetarium, check, robots, check, giant digital globe, check. — goop

Hundreds of hands-on exhibits draw families to this interactive science museum, which also has an Omnimax theater and the Northwest's largest planetarium. — Fodor's

This excellent museum offers hands-on science exhibits for kids, along with other special, temporary exhibits like Mummies of the World. — Lonely Planet

Located on the east bank of the Willamette River across from the south end of Waterfront Park, this modern science museum has six huge halls. — Frommer's

Pittock Mansion

Northwest District 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Henry Pittock was a lumber baron, but he loved marble halls. — Not For Tourists

At nearly the highest point in the West Hills, 1,000 feet above sea level, stands the most impressive mansion in Portland. — Frommer's

Henry Pittock, founder of the Oregonian, the city’s daily newspaper and the largest paper in the state, built himself a château 1,000 feet above the city — Where

Henry Pittock, the founder and publisher of the Oregonian newspaper, built this 22-room, castlelike mansion, which combines French Renaissance and Victorian styles. — Fodor's

The largest and most opulent home in Portland perches on a 940ft crest in Imperial Heights, looking east over the city, the river and the major peaks of the Cascade Mountains. — Michelin Guide

Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden

Southeast Portland 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

In April, thousands of rhododendron bushes and azaleas burst into flower, attracting visitors in larger numbers. — Fodor's

Lovely year-round, this seven-acre garden in the Eastmoreland neighborhood turns spectacular from April through June when 600 varieties of rhododendrons and azaleas burst into bloom — Michelin Guide

After roses, rhododendrons are Portland’s favorite flowering shrub. — Frommer's

Large, beautiful grounds are covered with more than 2000 full-grown rhododendrons, azaleas and other plants. — Lonely Planet

Waterfalls, ducks, geese, and eye-popping rhodies. Go in early May. — Not For Tourists

Washington Park

Southwest Portland 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Hoyt Arboretum showcases more than 1000 species of native and exotic trees and has 12 miles of walking trails. It's prettiest in the fall. — Lonely Planet

Unlike Forest Park, most of Washington Park has been landscaped to serve as a setting for its acclaimed gardens, zoo and nature-related attractions. — Michelin Guide

This park has enough sights and attractions that it’s easy to spend a full day here. If time is short, though, focus on the International Rose Garden. — Travel + Leisure

Washington Park is set on 546 acres on the city’s West Hills, where it overlooks downtown Portland and east beyond into the mountains — Where

Portland is justly proud of its green spaces, and foremost among them is Washington Park. — Frommer's

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Powell's City of Books

Pearl 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This is not really a bookstore at all; it’s a vast public amenity—almost a civic space. — Afar Magazine

The largest independent bookstore in the world, with more than 1.5 million new and used books, this Portland landmark can easily consume several hours. It's so big it has its own map... — Fodor's

The preeminent venues for literary readings in the Portland area are arguably the three Powell’s bookstores. — Where

Non-negotiable for locals and visitors alike; you must go. — Not For Tourists

One of the most popular attractions in Oregon is this retail pioneer — Michelin Guide

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Oregon Historical Society Museum

Downtown 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

If you'd like to learn about the people who discovered Oregon before you, visit this well-designed museum. — Frommer's

It covers the history of Oregon from the earliest Indian civilizations through the saga of the Oregon Trail right up to the issues surrounding Portland’s light rail. — Where

Eight-story-high trompe l'oeil murals of Lewis and Clark and the Oregon Trail rise beside the entrance plaza of this important repository of historical artifacts and documents — Michelin Guide

Impressive eight-story-high trompe l'oeil murals of Lewis and Clark and the Oregon Trail cover two sides of this downtown museum. — Fodor's

Along the tree-shaded South Park Blocks sits the state's primary history museum, which dedicates most of its space to the story of Oregon and the pioneers who made it. — Lonely Planet

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Oaks Amusement Park

Sellwood - Moreland Improvement League 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Oaks Park is a throwback to the days when streetcar companies built amusement parks to stimulate ridership — Where

The attractions here are family oriented and decidedly old-fashioned-a roller rink with a Wurlitzer organ, a dance pavilion, a carousel, non-tech game arcades, and 28 rides. — Michelin Guide

Admit it: Roller skating is AWESOME! — Not For Tourists

There's a small-town charm to this park that has bumper cars, thrill rides, miniature golf, and roller-skating. — Fodor's

Beneath the shady oaks for which the park is named, you'll find waterfront picnic sites, miniature golf, music, and plenty of thrilling rides. — Frommer's

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Mount Tabor Park

Portland 82 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

At this Olmsted Brothers-designed park, steep steps and a series of hiking trails lead up to three reservoirs that provide water for the city of Portland below and ultimately a summit. — Condé Nast Traveler

A playground on top of a volcano cinder cone? Yup, that's here. — Fodor's

It's an extinct volcano, for crying out loud! Hike up and enjoy the view. — Not For Tourists

Mt. Tabor, one of the few "highland" areas in East Portland, ranks as the youngest of the hundreds of volcanoes that erupted in the foothills of Mt. Hood eons ago. — Michelin Guide

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Portland Children's Museum

Southwest Portland 82 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Parents can seek solace at this museum, a great place to keep kids busy with interesting learning activities and exhibits. — Lonely Planet

Colorful sights and sounds offer a feast of sensations for kids of all ages where hands-on play is the order of the day. — Fodor's

A unique museum in the Lair Hill neighborhood offers three floors of play areas where young children can have fun while exercising their imaginations. — Michelin Guide

Located across the parking lot from the Oregon Zoo, this large, modern children's museum includes exhibits for children from newborns to 13 year olds. — Frommer's

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World Forestry Center

Southwest Portland 82 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Visitors will find interactive and multimedia exhibits that teach forest sustainability. — Fodor's

The center highlights the importance of the world's forests, with a focus on Pacific Northwest forests and their role in providing water, recreation, habitat and resources. — Lonely Planet

Although Oregon depends less and less on the timber industry with each passing year, this museum is still busy educating visitors about the importance of forest resources around the world. — Frommer's

Housed in an octagonal, cedar-clad building with a tentlike roof, this museum just west of the zoo is a storehouse of information about the world's forests. — Michelin Guide

Built by a consortium of timber and related industries, the World Forestry Center Museum offers information and hands-on exhibits emphasizing the forests of the Pacific Northwest and beyond. — Where

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End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center

Portland 80 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

With its three Paul Bunyan-size wagons parked in the middle of Abernethy Green (the official end of the Oregon Trail), this interpretive center is impossible to miss. — Frommer's

Sprawling across 8.5 acres of Abernathy Green, the historic main arrival area for Oregon Trail travelers, the Interpretive Center comprises three 50ft-high buildings shaped like covered wagons. — Michelin Guide

Resembling three large covered wagons, this spot 19 mi south of Portland is hard to miss. — Fodor's

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  • Outdoors
    22 parks, gardens and outdoor attractions
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    12 museums and galleries
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