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Rome

224 expert recommended attractions

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Borghese Gallery

Parioli 95 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Built as a pleasure palace by a member of the illustrious Italian family that spawned princes and popes aplenty, this intricately frescoed, marble-bedecked 17th-century villa houses one... — Departures

Begun in 1608 by Flaminio Ponzio and continued by Jan van Santen (Italianised to Giovanni Vasanzio) upon his death, the Casino Borghese was designed to house Cardinal Scipione Borghese's... — Time Out

If you thought the walk in the Villa Borghese was breathtaking, wait until you get to the Galleria Borghese. Gorgeous, sumptuous, and extremely popular (be sure to book tickets in... — Let's Go

If you only have time (or inclination) for one art gallery in Rome, make it this one. — Lonely Planet

This fabulous treasure-trove includes such masterpieces as Bernini's Apollo and Daphne, Titian's Sacred and Profane Love, Raphael's Deposition, and Caravaggio's Jerome. — Frommer's

Pantheon

Navona / Pantheon / Campo de’ Fiori 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

One of the wonders of the ancient world, this onetime pagan temple, a marvel of architectural harmony and proportion, is the best-preserved ancient building in Rome. — Fodor's

A 2000-year-old temple, now church, the Pantheon is the best preserved of ancient Rome’s great monuments. — Lonely Planet

One does not simply go to Rome and not see the Pantheon. One of the most beautiful and well-preserved buildings from Ancient Rome, this temple was originally built during the reign of... — Let's Go

This 1st-century wonder will take your breath away. Not only is it one of the city's most ancient sites, it's been in continuous use for centuries. Originally built as a private temple,... — Afar Magazine

The Pantheon is the best-preserved ancient building in Rome. — Time Out

Colosseum

Monti 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Inaugurated in 80 AD, the Flavian amphitheatre or Colosseum is the biggest in the Roman world (527m in circumference and 57m high). — Michelin Guide

Rome’s great gladiatorial arena is the most thrilling of the city's ancient sights. — Lonely Planet

Though there may no longer be gladiators and staged naval battles at Rome’s iconic Colosseum, it’s still a great hive of activity in central Rome. — Travel + Leisure

Half circus, half sports arena, Rome’s most famous classical ruin is unmissable – especially now that they have extended the visitor route to the underfloor passageways through which... — The Telegraph

One of Rome’s most recognizable ruins, attracting tourists... who marvel at the grand size of this concrete and stone structure built in 70 AD. — Condé Nast Traveler

Church of St. Louis of the French

Navona / Pantheon / Campo de’ Fiori 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

You might walk right by this church a few times, since it’s rather unimpressive from the outside. But like your mother said: you can’t change that face, so it’s your inner beauty that... — Let's Go

This has been the national church of France in Rome since 1589, and a stone salamander (the symbol of the Renaissance French monarch François I) is subtly carved into its facade. — Frommer's

Named after King Louis IX, this church was built as a house of worship for French people living in Rome in 1518. — Travel + Leisure

This church was built centuries ago as France's key liaison to the Vatican and the surrounding buildings still host French-affilicated religious and culture associations. — Afar Magazine

A pilgrimage spot for art lovers everywhere... adorned with three stunningly dramatic works by Caravaggio... now recognized to be among the world's greatest paintings. — Fodor's

Basilica di San Clemente al Laterano

Monti 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

From the Colosseum, head up Via San Giovanni in Laterano to this basilica. It isn't just another Roman church -- far from it. — Frommer's

A favourite with kids for its dungeon-like underground level, this 12th-century basilica is a three-dimensional Roman time-line. — Time Out

A Nesting Doll of Churches.  — Atlas Obscura

A multi-layered church and archaeological site, the Basilica of San Clemente is one of the best examples of how Rome is a layer cake of history. Entry level is the "new church," a... — Travel + Leisure

Founded in the 4C and dedicated to St Clement, this is one of Rome's earliest basilicas. Badly damaged in 1084 it was rebuilt, again on a basilical plan with three naves in the 12C. — Michelin Guide

Centrale Montemartini

Ostiense 91 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Antiquity meets Fritz Lang's Metropolis at the striking outpost of the Capitoline Museums. — Lonely Planet

Screw logic. Sometimes you just want to make a museum with gorgeous marble Aphrodite sculptures in front of hulking gray steam boilers. That’s what Centrale Montemartini was thinking.... — Let's Go

It may be true that the Centrale Montemartini contains merely the leftover ancient statuary from the Musei Capitolini but, this being Rome, the dregs are pretty impressive. — Time Out

This electricity power station is an unusual setting to find sculpture from the Musei Capitolini collections. — Michelin Guide

After visiting Rome's many old, art-cluttered palaces, the Centrale Montemartini feels like a breath of fresh air. — Fodor's

Trevi Fountain

Trevi 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Flocks of tourist visiting the Eternal City come to throw a coin into the Trevi Fountain in the Campo Marzio neighborhood. — Travel + Leisure

An aquatic marvel in a city filled with them, the fountain's unique drama is largely due to the site. — Fodor's

Supplied by water from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct and a triumph of the baroque style, it was based on the design of Nicolo Salvi and was completed in 1762. — Frommer's

It is universally known since Anita Ekberg bathed in it, wearing an evening dress, in Dolce Vità. — Michelin Guide

The legend says that if you throw a coin into the Trevi Fountain, you will return to the city.This beautiful work of art is located in the Trevi district of Rome, Italy.This fountain is... — Afar Magazine

Museo Nazionale Romano - Palazzo Altemps

Navona / Pantheon / Campo de’ Fiori 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Powerful Roman families in the 16th and 17th centuries prided themselves on their collections of classical statuary, and they had no qualms about bringing in a sculptor of their own to... — The Telegraph

Recently restored, this magnificent 15C palace today houses the Ludovisi-Boncompagni collection. — Michelin Guide

This branch of the National Roman Museum is housed in a 15th-century palace that was restored and opened to the public in 1997. — Frommer's

The 15th- to 16th-century Palazzo Altemps has been beautifully restored to house part of the state-owned Museo Nazionale Romano stock of Roman treasures. — Time Out

Just north of Piazza Navona, Palazzo Altemps is a beautiful, late 15th-century palazzo, housing the best of the Museo Nazionale Romano’s formidable collection of classical sculpture. — Lonely Planet

Vatican Museums

Rome 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

It's a brisk ten-minute walk around the Vatican walls from St Peter's to the Vatican Museums. — Time Out

The tiny sovereign state of the Vatican is an essential stopover on any Roman holiday and offers enough in itself to fill days if not weeks. Consecrated in 1626, the current St. Peter's... — Concierge

And now, you patient and cultured world traveler, it’s time for the main event. Let’s go to the Sistine Chapel. It’s not difficult to find: just follow the mass of tourists leading you... — Let's Go

This seemingly endless series of museums and galleries occupies a good portion of Vatican City—the world's smallest independent country—and it overflows with masterpieces. — Condé Nast Traveler

The Vatican palaces and museum spaces consist of an estimated 1,400 rooms, chapels, and galleries; one of the largest museums in the world for the smallest country in the world. Beyond... — Fodor's

National Museum of Rome

Esquilino 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Come here to get a real feel for ancient Roman art—the collection rivals even the Vatican's. — Fodor's

If you ever wanted to know what all those emperors from your history books looked like, this museum makes them live again, togas and all. — Frommer's

One of Rome's great unheralded museums, this is a fabulous treasure trove of classical art. — Lonely Planet

The Italian state's spectacular collection of ancient art underwent a radical reorganisation in the run-up to 2000. — Time Out

The Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, a former Jesuit college, houses one of the richest collections of Ancient Art in the world (along with Palazzo Altemps and the Capitoline Museums).... — Michelin Guide

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Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore

Monti 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Located just minutes away from Termini Station, Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore is an enormous basilica dedicated to everyone’s favorite virgin (no, not you). Legend has it that this... — Let's Go

Founded by Pope Sixtus III (432-440), this is one of Rome's four great basilicas, and has been remodelled many times down the centuries. — Michelin Guide

Originally built in the fifth century, Santa Maria Maggiore contains one of the best preserved Byzantine interiors in Rome. — Travel + Leisure

Behind this blowsy Baroque façade is one of the most striking basilica-form churches in Rome. — Time Out

Santa Maria Maggiore is one of the oldest churches in Rome, built around 440 by Pope Sixtus III. — Fodor's

Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant'Angelo

Vatican / Borgo 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Begun by Emperor Hadrian in AD 135 as his own mausoleum, Castel Sant'Angelo has variously been a fortress, prison and papal residence. — Time Out

Standing between the Tiber and the Vatican, this circular and medieval "castle" has long been one of Rome's most distinctive landmarks. — Fodor's

A round brick structure spiting all the marble around it, this mausoleum for Hadrian and his family turned palace, castle, prison, and (finally) museum, stands on the banks of the Tiber,... — Let's Go

This overpowering castle on the Tiber was Rome's chief citadel and dungeon and has seen more blood, treachery, and turmoil than any other left in Rome. — Frommer's

St. Gregory the Great had a encouraging vision of an angel sheathing its sword above this massive brick castle built atop the drum of Hadrian's first-century mausoleum. — Travel + Leisure

Palatine Hill

Piazza Venezia / Ancient City 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The monumental door of the Roman agora was completed in 2 A.D. thanks to the subsidies firstly of Julius Caesar, and then of Augustus. — Michelin Guide

This is where Romulus founded the city of Rome and where it all happened—the former marshland was reclaimed in the 7th century to become the epicenter of social, religious, political, and... — Travel + Leisure

The heart of Ancient Rome. The center of all public life. A place once alive with markets, celebrations, religious ceremonies, and Ciceronian orations. Even if you’re a Vestal Virgin,... — Let's Go

A number of the most famous Roman monuments have recently received a revamp thanks to a number of the country’s fashion houses. The Colosseum, for example, underwent a first phase, $33... — Departures

When it came to cremating Caesar, purchasing a harlot for the night, or sacrificing a naked victim, the Roman Forum was the place to be. — Frommer's

Santa Maria in Trastevere

Trastevere 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This Romanesque church at the colorful center of Trastevere was built around A.D. 350 and is one of the oldest in Rome. — Frommer's

Trastevere's glittering heart is the beautiful Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere, which features what is said to be the oldest church dedicated to the Virgin Mary in Rome. — Lonely Planet

Santa Maria in Trastevere is a sight for weary eyes lost in the winding streets of Rome. Just when you start giving up faith, the wide piazza opens up before you with a large fountain... — Let's Go

This is undoubtedly one of Trastevere's most charming squares, with its central fountain, rebuilt by Bernini, the church facade and its mosaic, and café terraces that overrun the pavement area. — Michelin Guide

This stunning church, with its welcoming portico and façade with shimmering 13th-century mosaics, overlooks the traffic-free piazza of the same name. — Time Out

Villa Farnesina

Trastevere 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Built on the banks of the Tiber by Baldassare Peruzzi for the banker Agostino Chigi (1465-1520), this originally suburban villa had many great Renaissance artists work upon it. — Michelin Guide

Money was no object to the extravagant Agostino Chigi... evident in this elegant villa, built for him about 1511. — Fodor's

This gorgeous 16th-century villa is famous for its stunning frescoes. — Lonely Planet

Villa Farnesina was built between 1508 and 1511 to a design by Baldassare Peruzzi as a pleasure palace and holiday home for the fabulously rich papal banker Agostino Chigi. — Time Out

Agostino "il Magnifico" Chigi (1465-1520), the richest man in Europe, once lived in this sumptuous villa built for him by the architect Baldassare Peruzzi between 1508 and 1511. — Frommer's

Santa Maria della Vittoria

Esquilino 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This modest-looking Baroque church, its interior cosily candlelit and adorned with marble and gilt, holds one of Bernini's most famous works. — Time Out

Like the church of Santa Susanna across Piazza San Bernardo, this church was designed by Carlo Maderno, but this one is best known for Bernini's sumptuous Baroque decoration. — Fodor's

Built by Carlo Maderno, the same architect who constructed the church of Santa Susanna, although this is a little later and so reflects the advent of the Counter-Reformation. — Michelin Guide

The Site: This riotously baroque 17th-century church is most famous for Bernini's lavish Cornaro Chapel. — Travel + Leisure

This modest church is an unlikely setting for an extraordinary work of art – Bernini’s extravagant and sexually charged Santa Teresa trafitta dall’amore di Dio (Ecstasy of St Teresa). — Lonely Planet

Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls

Ostiense 86 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The Basilica of St. Paul, whose origins go back to the time of Constantine, is Rome's fourth great patriarchal church; it was erected over the tomb of St. Paul. — Frommer's

St. Paul's is one of Rome's most historic and important churches. — Fodor's

A sycamore-shaded stroll along the Tiber River takes you to the palm-treed paradise of the Basilica Papale di San Paolo fuori le Mura. — Afar Magazine

One of Catholicism's four major basilicas has a series of papal portraits that are said to predict the end of the world.  — Atlas Obscura

In an enormous piazza where all the little bambini have water fights (ideally Catholics vs. heretics: water guns of instant baptism) stands the Basilica di San Paolo Fuori le Mura. As... — Let's Go

St. Peter's Basilica

Rome 86 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

With one of the most iconic domes in the world, Saint Peter’s Basilica is more than a building to be admired from the outside. — Let's Go

In this city of outstanding churches, none can hold a candle to St Peter’s Basilica (Basilica di San Pietro), Italy’s largest, richest and most spectacular church. — Lonely Planet

Peter was buried here in A.D. 64 near the site of his execution, and in 324 Constantine commissioned a basilica to be built over Peter's tomb. — Frommer's

After 120 years as a building site, the current St Peter's was consecrated on 18 November 1626 by Urban VIII - exactly 1,300 years after the consecration of the first basilica on the site. — Time Out

Countless artists and architects, including Bramante, Michelangelo and Carlo Maderno, have worked on this building since the Emperor Constantine first erected a church here in 324, on the... — Michelin Guide

Capitoline Museum

Piazza Venezia / Ancient City 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The entire collection was finally opened to the public in 1734, by Pope Clement XII. Many statues remain frustratingly label-less but there is a decent audioguide. — Time Out

The Capitoline Museums house a collection of ancient sculptures in a pair of buildings designed by Michelangelo in the mid-16th century. The architecture on its own is stunning, but add... — Afar Magazine

Dating to 1471, the Capitoline Museums (Musei Capitolini), the world's oldest national museums, houses one of Italy's finest collections of classical sculpture. — Lonely Planet

Based at the Palazzo dei Conservatori and Palazzo Nuovo, although part of the collection (notably items excavated in the rome region) are now on display at the Montemartini Power Station. — Michelin Guide

By the time the public was given access to the Capitoline Museums in 1734, popes had been amassing this peerless collection of artworks for some 250 years.The gems are now spread through... — The Telegraph

Terme di Caracalla

Rome 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Named for Emperor Caracalla, the baths were completed in the early 3rd century. — Frommer's

The high-vaulted ruins of the Baths of Caracalla, surrounded by trees and grass, are pleasantly peaceful today, but were anything but tranquil in their heyday. — Time Out

Built by Caracalla in the year 212, these baths covered 11ha and could accommodate 1 600 people at any one time. — Michelin Guide

The remnants of Caracalla’s vast 3rd-century baths complex are among Rome’s most awe-inspiring ruins. — Lonely Planet

The Terme di Caracalla are some of Rome's most massive—yet least-visited—ruins. — Fodor's

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