Split

Showing 18 attractions
9
7 reviews
The original palace, which took about 10 years to complete, was built in AD 298 — Fodor's
8
5 reviews
At this stellar art museum, you’ll see a comprehensive, well-arranged collection of works by Ivan Meštrović. — Lonely Planet
8
3 reviews
The main body of the cathedral was originally built in Roman times as Diocletian’s mausoleum. — Frommer's
8
5 reviews
Although it's now the cathedral's baptistery, this wonderfully intact building was originally an ancient Roman temple, dedicated to the king of the gods. — Lonely Planet
8
4 reviews
On the other side of the National Theatre stands the Archaeological Museum where key historical finds from the nearby Roman capital of Salona are the main draw: mosaics, sarcophagi and such like — Time Out
8
4 reviews
This view point...commands a unique point of view of the port, the Riva and the palace and campanile which stand out from the jungle of buildings in the new town. — Michelin Guide
8
3 reviews
The museum holds an interesting collection of traditional Dalmatian folk costumes with incredibly rich embroidery and ornamentation. — Michelin Guide
8
2 reviews
The ruins of the ancient city of Salona, situated at the foot of the mountains just northeast of Split, are the most archaeologically important in Croatia. — Lonely Planet
8
4 reviews
You'll notice touches of folk art, Modernism and Classicism as you gaze at what represents two decades of labour on the part of this 20th-century master. — Time Out
7
3 reviews
One of the oldest Croatian museums, it houses more than 20,000 Croatian archaeological artifacts, only a quarter of which are on display — Fodor's
7
3 reviews
Today it's a meeting point for elderly gentlemen to discuss the daily news, but Pjaca was the first settlement to be developed beyond the palace walls in the 14th century. — Afar Magazine
7
2 reviews
Along the shore-facing side of Diocletian’s Palace is Riva, a seafront promenade lined with palm trees, bustling cafés and shaded benches. — Afar Magazine
7
2 reviews
Admire the huge thick walls and lovely vaulted ceilings. — Michelin Guide
7
2 reviews
The building dates from 1895, designed by the Viennese firm Hellmer and Fellner as part of the preparations for a state visit by Emperor Franz Josef. — Fodor's
7
2 reviews
Tracing European art from the 15th century up to the present, it includes religious icons, Old Master paintings, and contemporary sculpture and video installations. — Frommer's
7
2 reviews
Displays a mish-mash of objects related to the city’s proud history. — Frommer's
7
2 reviews
This major landmark stands just outside the northern wall of the Diocletian's Palace — Time Out
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