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Tokyo

152 expert recommended attractions

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Meiji Jingu Shrine

Shibuya / Harajuku / Ebisu 96 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

In typical Tokyo style, one of the city’s most peaceful forest shrines is just a stone’s throw from the 21st-century Harajuku crowds. A wide path lined with thick, green forests leads to... — The Telegraph

One of the most important Shinto buildings in Tokyo and it is where newly-weds come to seek spiritual transformation ... access is via a majestic gate. — Michelin Guide

The Meiji Shrine was built in honor of Emperor Meiji, the 19th-century emperor who opened Japan to the West. — On the Grid

This is Tokyo's most venerable Shinto shrine, opened in 1920 in honor of Emperor and Empress Meiji, who were instrumental in opening Japan to the outside world more than 120 years ago. — Frommer's

Meiji Shrine, a peaceful, wooded haven dedicated to Emperor Meiji (1852-1912). — Condé Nast Traveler

Tokyo National Museum

Ueno, Asakusa 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The national museum of Japan has a spectacular collection of Japanese art, but the displays can be on the old-fashioned side. — Concierge

The Tokyo National Museum in Ueno Park is the largest repository of Japanese art and artifacts in the world. — Travel + Leisure

The National Museum is not only the largest and oldest museum in Japan, but it also boasts the largest collection of Japanese art in the world. — Frommer's

If you have just one day to devote to museum-going in Tokyo and are interested in Japanese art and artefacts, this is the place to visit. — Time Out

If you visit only one museum in Tokyo, make it this one. Considered the Louvre of Japan, the Tokyo National Museum's grand buildings hold the world's largest collection of Japanese art. — Lonely Planet

Mori Art Museum

Akasaka / Roppongi 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

One of the best things about this respectable institution, opened in 2003, is the 360-degree vista from the top of the 54-story Mori Tower; indeed, many visitors come for the view and... — Departures

This museum is one of the leading contemporary art showcases in Tokyo. — Fodor's

Although the installations alone, ranging from paintings and fashion to architecture and design, are worth a visit, an extra incentive is the attached Tokyo City View observatory. — Frommer's

Often used as the venue for important international exhibitions ... shows are always high quality and tied in with the most current developments in contemporary art. — Michelin Guide

An ambitious exhibition program with a strong emphasis on contemporary Asian art. — Condé Nast Traveler

Edo-Tokyo Museum

Tokyo 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

From an open plaza on massive pillars an escalator takes you directly to the sixth floor—and back in time 300 years ... If you only visit one non-art museum in Tokyo, make this it. — Fodor's

Great visual displays create a vivid portrayal of Tokyo through the centuries. I wouldn't miss it. — Frommer's

This large museum’s outlandish architectural style may not appeal to everyone, but the building houses the city’s best collection of displays dealing with the history of Tokyo. — Time Out

Spectacular Edo-Tokyo Museum, whose design is inspired by the traditional Japanese rice loft, is home to a striking collection that recounts the history of Tokyo ... a lively museum. — Michelin Guide

By far the best city-history museum we have ever encountered. — Lonely Planet

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Toshogu Shrine

Ueno, Asakusa 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Come here to pay respects to the man who made Edo (present-day Tokyo) the seat of his government and thus elevated the small village to the most important city in the country. — Frommer's

This Shinto shrine, which was founded to house the relics of the shogun has miraculously escaped the disasters which have hit Tokyo ... stop to admire the magnificent Chinese-style door. — Michelin Guide

The real glory of Tosho-gu is its so-called Chinese Gate, at the end of the building, and the fence on either side that has intricate carvings of birds, animals, fish, and shells of every description. — Fodor's

Toshogu is dedicated to the first Tokugawa shogun, Ieyasu, and its style is similar to the shrine in Nikko (also called Toshogu) where he is buried. — Time Out

Tōshōgū, like its counterpart in Nikkō, is dedicated to Tokugawa Ieyasu, who unified Japan. — Lonely Planet

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Senso-ji Temple

Ueno, Asakusa 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Founded in the 7C and dedicated to Kannon, the Goddess of Mercy, the Buddhist temple of Senso-ji was toppled by the bombings of the Second World War. This reconstruction, identical to its... — Michelin Guide

The garden of Dembo-in is ... the best-kept secret in Asakusa. — Fodor's

Walk down Nakamise-dōri to reach the temple entrance – to your left you'll spot the Five-Storeyed Pagoda (55m) almost begging you to take its photo. — Lonely Planet

Pass through the famous red gates (Kaminarimon) and walk up Nakamise Street along a row of small shops selling everything from tourist trinkets to traditional crafts. — Concierge

Tokyo's oldest and most popular temple. — Frommer's

Ghibli Museum

Tokyo 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A magical place that lets you play in and explore the world of Studio Ghibli.  — Atlas Obscura

A great trip with the kids or adult fans of Miyazaki's films. — Afar Magazine

Only fans of Japanese animation (anime) may find the obstacles of visiting this unique museum worth the effort. — Frommer's

This guided tour around the former studio of Japan's foremost animated filmmaker is an enchanting experience. — Michelin Guide

Master animator Hayao Miyazaki, whose Studio Ghibli produced Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away, designed this museum himself. — Lonely Planet

Imperial Palace

Ginza / Tokyo Nihonbashi 86 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The Emperor, who lives there still, opens it to the public on 23 December and 2 January each year. The rest of the year, visitors can wander among the 250,000 trees of Higashi-gyoen Garden. — Michelin Guide

Located on the former site of the 15th-century Edo Castle, the Imperial Palace is the official residence of Japan's royal family. — Travel + Leisure

The Imperial Palace, home of the Imperial family, is the heart and soul of Tokyo. — Frommer's

Tokyo's Imperial Palace stands on what was once the site of Edo castle and residence of the Tokugawa shogunate. — Time Out

Japan's Imperial Palace is an appropriate place to start the city's laundry list of interesting sights, as it is – geographically, at least – the centre of Tokyo. — Lonely Planet

The Tsukiji Market

Ginza / Tokyo Nihonbashi 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This huge wholesale fish market -- the largest in Japan and one of the largest in the world -- is a must for anyone who has never seen such a market in action. — Frommer's

Tsukiji covers an area of more than two million square feet and handles more than 2,000 tons of fish each day. — Concierge

If it has gills and lives in the ocean, you're likely to find it at Tokyo's Tsukiji Fish Market, a testament to Japan's proximity to the sea, as well as its culinary love affair with seafood. — Afar Magazine

Tsukiji Fish Market has the distinct honour of being the world's biggest seafood market. — Lonely Planet

If you have time for only one market, this is the one to see. — Fodor's

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Nezu Museum

Akasaka / Roppongi 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This recently renovated museum offers a striking blend of old and new: a renowned collection of Japanese, Chinese and Korean antiquities in a gallery space designed by contemporary architect Kuma Keng. — Lonely Planet

This was once the private estate of Tobu Railway president Kaichiro Nezu, who bequeathed it together with his extensive collection of Japanese and East Asian art ... — Frommer's

Venerable old museum... collection of pre-modern art from Japan, China and elsewhere in Asia includes more than 7,000 pieces. — Condé Nast Traveler

Traditional Japanese and Asian works of art owned by Meiji-period railroad magnate and politician Kaichiro Nezu. — Fodor's

<span style="font-weight: normal;">On a quiet street not far from the retail bustle of Omotesando is an unexpectedly serene finding: the Nezu Museum. Designed by cult architect Kengo Kuma... — The Telegraph

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Ueno Park

Ueno, Asakusa 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Tokyo's first public park, Ueno Park took over what was once the sacred temple grounds of Kan'ei-ji Temple, no longer standing after being destroyed in the Boshin War in 1868. — Condé Nast Traveler

Ueno Park -- on the northeast edge of the Yamanote Line -- is one of the largest parks in Tokyo and one of the most popular places in the city for Japanese families on a day's outing. — Frommer's

This park, which is the largest and oldest in Tokyo, really captures the imagination. — Michelin Guide

Museums, gardens, shrines, lotus ponds and even a few pandas at the zoo – the expansive, green Ueno Park is a great one-stop shop. Top on the culture fix list is Tokyo National Museum,... — The Telegraph

The cherry-blossom viewing spots are impossible to miss – just look for the many revellers under the cherries along the main walkways in the park. — Lonely Planet

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Shitamachi Museum

Ueno, Asakusa 85 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This century-old liquor shop (which operated until 1986) was returned it to its original state, with old sake barrels, weights, measures and posters. — Lonely Planet

Japanese society in the days of the Tokugawa shoguns was rigidly stratified. Some 80% of the city's land was allotted to the warrior class, temples, and shrines. — Fodor's

Shitamachi means "downtown" and refers to the area of Tokyo in which commoners used to live, mainly around Ueno and Asakusa. — Frommer's

This museum takes you back to a lost world by recreating the working-class district of Shitamachi, which was razed to the ground by the 1945 bombings. — Michelin Guide

This museum presents the living environment of ordinary Tokyoites between the pivotal Meiji restoration of 1868 and the Great Earthquake of 1923. — Time Out

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Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography

Shibuya / Harajuku / Ebisu 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This museum has an impressive 22,000 works in its photographic inventory, ranging from the historical to the contemporary, with about 70% by Japanese photographers. — Frommer's

Anyone interested in photographic art should be sure to visit the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography. — Michelin Guide

This is the city’s top photography museum, with excellent changing exhibitions of both international and Japanese photographers. — Lonely Planet

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Asakura Choso Museum

Ueno, Asakusa 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A very unique home that once belonged to a famous artist, making it a must if you've never had the opportunity to visit a traditional Japanese house. — Frommer's

Now a museum with a number of the artist's signature realist works, mostly of people and cats, on display. — Lonely Planet

This delightful studio and home laid out around a fine Japanese garden was the property of the sculptor Asakura Fumio. — Michelin Guide

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Suntory Museum of Art

Akasaka / Roppongi 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Housed in a modern Japanese building designed by architect Kengo Kuma, the Suntory Musuem of Art is a striking white structure with vertical louvers that run the length of the exterior. — Travel + Leisure

Founded in 1961 and moving to Tokyo Midtown in 2007, this private museum boasts a collection of 3,000 Japanese antique arts and crafts. — Frommer's

The museum possesses a 3000-piece collection (lacquerware, Satsuma ceramics, textiles, Noh costumes) ... elements of which are presented in the temporary exhibitions it organizes. — Michelin Guide

Since its original 1961 opening, the Suntory Museum of Art has subscribed to an underlying philosophy of lifestyle art. — Lonely Planet

The museum's current home at Tokyo Midtown Galleria is a beautiful place to view some of Tokyo's finest fine art exhibitions. — Fodor's

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Tokyo Metropolitan Government Buildings

Shinjuku 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Tokyo's city hall -- designed by one of Japan's best-known architects, Kenzo Tange -- is an impressive addition to the skyscrapers of west Shinjuku. — Frommer's

Tokyo’s seat of power, designed by Tange Kenzō and completed in 1991, looms large and looks somewhat like a pixelated cathedral (or the lair of an animated villain). Take an elevator from... — Lonely Planet

This Kenzo Tange–designed, grandiose, city hall complex is clearly meant to remind observers that Tokyo's annual budget is bigger than that of the average developing country. — Fodor's

Admission to the observatory is free and well worth it for a fantastic, sweeping view. — Afar Magazine

Kenzo Tange's domineering Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building is worth visiting purely to have a good look at its spectacular edifice. — Time Out

Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden

Shinjuku 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This lovely 150-acre park was once the estate of the powerful Naito family of feudal lords, who were among the most trusted retainers of the Tokugawa shoguns. — Fodor's

Formerly the private estate of a feudal lord and then of the Imperial family, this is considered one of the most important parks of the Meiji Era. — Frommer's

Though Shinjuku-gyōen was designed as an imperial retreat (completed 1906), it’s now definitively a park for everyone. — Lonely Planet

Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden, which became the imperial garden after 1906, brings together several distinct styles ... also where the Prime Minister holds his annual hanami. — Michelin Guide

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National Film Center at The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

Ginza / Tokyo Nihonbashi 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Presents a good summary of Japanese art from the Meiji period up to the 1980s. — Michelin Guide

Japanese and foreign films - 19,000 of them - star at the country’s only national facility devoted to the preservation and study of cinema. — Time Out

This 16th-century boardinghouse for English merchants has been turned into a museum that hosts chamber music concerts 1 or 2 evenings a week. — Frommer's

MOMAT's extensive collection is mainly built around Japanese modern art from 1900 to 1960. — Condé Nast Traveler

An archive of Japanese and foreign films, as well as books, periodicals, posters and other materials. — Lonely Planet

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Hama Rikyu Gardens

Odaiba / Shiodome / Shinbashi 82 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This urban oasis has origins stretching back 300 years, when it served as a retreat for a former feudal lord and as duck-hunting and falconry grounds for the Tokugawa shoguns. — Frommer's

The garden is an unexpected pocket of greenery, with beautiful pines, a large tidal pond, and two duck-hunting fields. — Condé Nast Traveler

The special thing about Hamarikyu-teien Garden ... is its pond, whose water level fluctuates with the tide. — Michelin Guide

If the relentless concrete and expressways get to be too much, take a short walk from Shiodome station to historic Hamarikyu Garden. — Concierge

A tiny sanctuary of Japanese tradition and nature that's surrounded by towering glass buildings is a great place to relax or walk off a filling Tsukiji sushi breakfast. — Fodor's

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Roppongi Hills, Shop & Restaurant Area

Akasaka / Roppongi 82 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Head to the rear of the Roppongi Hills complex and you'll find this covered outdoor arena, used for a wide range of free and paid events throughout the year, from concerts to beer festivals. — Time Out

Opened in 2003, Roppongi Hills was the dream of real-estate developer Mori Minoru, who long envisaged a transformation of Roppongi. — Lonely Planet

Home to more than 200 shops, restaurants, and services, Roppongi Hills is one of Tokyo's premiere shopping destinations, located in the heart of an area that includes residences, a... — Travel + Leisure

Tokyo, which is on a par with Shanghai when it comes to architecture of gigantic proportions, has a liking for shopping complexes housed in skyscrapers. — Michelin Guide

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