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Toronto

72 expert recommended attractions

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CN Tower

Entertainment District 97 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The tallest freestanding tower in the Western Hemisphere, this landmark stretches 1,815 feet and 5 inches high and marks Toronto with its distinctive silhouette. — Fodor's

Riding those glass elevators up the highest freestanding structure in the world (553m) is one of those things in life you just have to do. — Lonely Planet

The CN Tower may no longer be the world's tallest freestanding structure (thanks, Burj Dubai), but it's still an impressive attraction. — Frommer's

One of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World holds the world's tallest metal staircase.  — Atlas Obscura

Once the world’s tallest tower, the 1,815-ft landmark offers panoramic views over the city and Lake Ontario — The Telegraph

Royal Ontario Museum

Midtown 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Thrusting out over Bloor Street, this deconstructivist work of architecture has divided critics across the board. — Concierge

Celebrating its centennial in 2014, the multidisciplinary ROM is Canada's biggest natural history museum and one of the largest museums in North America. — Lonely Planet

The ROM is like the Natural History Museum and British Museum rolled in to one — The Telegraph

This is Canada's largest museum and the fifth largest on the continent, with 6 million objects in its collections. — Frommer's

The glass-and-steel structure is, depending on your point of view, either a grand gesture or a God-awful folly. — Time Out

The AGO, Art Gallery of Ontario

Dundas Square Area 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

One of the largest art museums in North America, the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) showcases more than 80,000 works dating from A.D. 100 to present day. — Travel + Leisure

The AGO houses art collections both excellent and extensive (bring your stamina). — Lonely Planet

Contrast Old Masters with Canada’s own Group of Seven, from Tom Thomson’s depictions of fiery autumn colours to Lawren S Harris’ paintings of ice and snow. — The Telegraph

If you go to only one major attraction while you're in Toronto, let it be the AGO. — Frommer's

The AGO is hard to miss: the monumental glass and titanium facade designed by Toronto native son Frank Gehry hovering over the main building is a stunning beauty. — Fodor's

Bata Shoe Museum

The Annex 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A playful take on a shoe box, Raymond Moriyama's oddly shaped building houses everything from native slippers to celebrity footwear. — Time Out

It's important in life to be well shod, a stance the Bata Shoe Museum takes seriously. — Lonely Planet

Imelda Marcos: Eat your heart out. This modern museum houses the shoe-magnate Bata family's 10,000-item collection. — Frommer's

The ever-rotating exhibits cover a wide breadth of countries and time periods—you might see slippers worn by Chinese women with bound feet, yucca sandals made by Native Americans. — Condé Nast Traveler

This unique museum draws on its 10,000-piece collection to illustrate a 4,500-year history of shoemaking and mankind's footwear. — Michelin Guide

Casa Loma

The Annex 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The Medieval mansion is a popular tourist attraction. — Michelin Guide

A kitschy glitch in the city's skyline to locals, this castle on a hill offers an inspiring view of the sweep of the city. — Frommer's

A European-style castle... grand display of extravagance. — Fodor's

Toronto's only castle may have never housed royalty, but it certainly has grandeur, lording over The Annex on a cliff that was once the shoreline of the glacial Lake Iroquois. — Lonely Planet

Some love it, others dismiss it as a kitsch folly. Either way, Casa Loma is a sight to behold, with its corbelled towers and battlements. — Time Out

Hockey Hall of Fame

Old Town & Downtown 86 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A tribute to Canada's national game, this sports shrine features more than 5,110 sq m (50,000 sq ft) of games, displays and memorabilia. — Time Out

Inside an ornate rococo gray stone Bank of Montréal building (c 1885), the Hockey Hall of Fame is a Canadian institution. — Lonely Planet

Even if you're not a hockey fan, it's worth a trip here to see this shrine to Canada's favorite sport. — Fodor's

For all its highbrow cosmopolitanism, Toronto is, nevertheless, the biggest hockey city in the world. — Concierge

Canada's favorite sport and the favorite museum of Canadians who love it. — Michelin Guide

Ontario Science Centre

East York 86 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

It has been called a museum of the 21st century, but it's much more than that. Where else can you stand at the edge of a black hole, work hand-in-clamp with a robot, or land on the moon? — Fodor's

Climb a rock wall, journey to the center of a human heart, catch a criminal with DNA fingerprinting and race an Olympic bobsled at the excellent, interactive Ontario Science Centre. — Lonely Planet

This popular attraction consists largely of interactive exhibits on science and technology. — Michelin Guide

The multi-level centre houses 800 or so science exhibits, plus Toronto's only planetarium and an Omnimax movie theatre. — Time Out

Since this pioneering interactive science museum opened in 1969, generations of Toronto's kids, and their offspring, have proven loyal fans. — Frommer's

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Gardiner Museum

Downtown 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The first specialist museum of ceramic art in North America. — Time Out

The Gardiner showcases a collection of more than 3,000 pieces, ranging from ancient Mayan figurines to 17th-century English Delftware and dynamic contemporary pieces. — Travel + Leisure

The only museum in Canada dedicated to ceramic art... does its job impressively. — Frommer's

This museum, the project of collectors George and Helen Gardiner, features pottery and porcelain from a variety of countries and cultures. — Michelin Guide

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St. Lawrence Market

Downtown 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This handsome food market is, in fact, two tiers. — Frommer's

A lovely landmark and an excellent place to sample Canadian bacon, this market was originally built in 1844 as the first true Toronto city hall. — Fodor's

One of the world's 25 best markets by Food & Wine magazine, St Lawrence is a foodie favourite. — Time Out

Old York's sensational St Lawrence Market has been a neighborhood meeting place for over two centuries. — Lonely Planet

The St. Lawrence Market is great. — Afar Magazine

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Harbourfront Centre

Harbourfront 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Once the site of railroad yards, docks, and warehouses, this waterfront area was reclaimed by the government in the '70s and turned into the Harbourfront Centre. — Concierge

The 4-hectare not-for-profit Harbourfront Centre exists to educate and entertain Toronto's diverse community. — Lonely Planet

This cultural center encompasses a 38-hectare (94-acre) strip of waterfront land, once-abandoned warehouses, charming piers, and an old smokestack. — Frommer's

An annual event from January through May, New World Stage hosts a choice selection of theatre and dance companies from around the world. — Time Out

Stretching from just west of York Street to Spadina Avenue, this culture-and-recreation center is a match for San Francisco's Pier 39 and Baltimore's Inner Harbor. — Fodor's

Spadina Museum

Midtown 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Reflecting the grandeur of Victorian and Edwardian styles, the spacious drawing room... and the airy wicker-furnished palm room show the comforts the Austin family expected. — Michelin Guide

This circa-1866 mansion with spectacular seasonal gardens reopened in 2010 after an extensive, expensive renovation. — Frommer's

Atop the Baldwin Steps, this gracious home and its Victorian-Edwardian gardens were built in 1866 as a country estate for financier James Austin and his family. — Lonely Planet

This 50-room mansion was built for financier James Austin in 1866, but his son added even more space in the 20th century, so it now has elements of both Victorian and Edwardian architecture. — Time Out

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The Elgin & Winter Garden Theatre Centre

Old Town & Downtown 83 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A restored masterpiece, the Elgin & Winter Garden Theatre is the world's last operating double-decker theater. — Lonely Planet

Billed as the last operating double-decker theatre in the world, this complex is also famous for its beauty. — Time Out

Offer everything from Broadway musicals and dramas to concerts and opera performances... with the Toronto International Film Festival. — Frommer's

This splendid structure, which was designated a national historic site in 1982, houses one of the few remaining double-decker theatres in the world. — Michelin Guide

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Rogers Centre

Downtown West 82 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Home to baseball's Blue Jays and was the world's first stadium with a fully retractable roof. — Fodor's

Home to American League Baseball's Toronto Blue Jays. The multipurpose stadium hosts rock concerts, conventions and trade shows as well as sports. — Michelin Guide

Awe-inspiring, the Rogers Centre sports stadium opened in 1989 with the world's first fully retractable dome roof and seating for up to 55,000 people. — Lonely Planet

Resembling a giant white beetle... is a more significant building than the Air Canada Centre, and also has a more arresting tour. — Time Out

The biggest venue in the city, it is not used regularly for music but occasionally draws superstar like U2 and AC/DC. — Frommer's

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Black Creek Pioneer Village

North York 82 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Set among abundant greenery and dirt roads flanked by wooden sidewalks and split-rail fences, the ensemble exudes a bygone-era charm. — Michelin Guide

Black Creek Pioneer Village re-creates rural life in 19th-century Ontario. — Lonely Planet

A rural, mid-19th-century living-history-museum village that makes you feel as though you've gone through a time warp. — Fodor's

In this quaint reconstruction of a Victorian-era village, costumed interpreters cheerily answer questions about life in the 19th century. — Frommer's

This quaint re-creation of 19th-century village life could easily have become 'Ye Olde Disneyesque Embarrassment', but it's actually an interesting place to spend an afternoon. — Time Out

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Ontario Place

Queen West, Chinatown & Little Italy 81 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This sprawling, innovative leisure complex... with an emphasis on family entertainment and recreation. — Michelin Guide

For all its Space Age looks, this is really just a fun amusement park, more thrilling than Centreville on Centre Island, but small in comparison with Paramount Canada's Wonderland. — Frommer's

This public amusement park was built in the 1970s, when Canadian nationalism (and, some would say, government spending) was at its zenith. — Time Out

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Fort York National Historic Site

Queen West, Chinatown & Little Italy 81 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Established by the British in 1793 to defend the then town of York, Fort York was almost entirely destroyed during the War of 1812. — Lonely Planet

Fort York was the primary guardian of Toronto's harbour. — Michelin Guide

The most historic site in Toronto is a must for anyone interested in the city's origins. — Fodor's

For those interested in history -- especially military history -- this is a treat. — Frommer's

The museum offers guided tours and historical re-enactments, and performances of period music and dance. — Time Out

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Campbell House Museum

Queen Street and West Queen West 80 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The restored rooms contain some fine period pieces and surviving portraits of the Campbell family. — Michelin Guide

This is one of the city's older treasures of Georgian architecture. — Time Out

The Georgian mansion of Sir William Campbell, the sixth chief justice of Upper Canada, is now one of Toronto's best house museums. — Fodor's

This lovely old house has a small art gallery filled with rotating exhibitions. — Frommer's

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Mackenzie House

Downtown 80 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This Greek Revival brick row house dates from the mid-19th century. It was once the home of William Lyon Mackenzie, a fiery orator and newspaper editor who had a most unusual career. — Frommer's

Just steps away from the hustle and bustle of Yonge and Dundas Square is a hidden heritage treasure known as the Mackenzie House. — On the Grid

This 19C brick row house, with its four chimneys and single dormer, was the last home of William Lyon Mackenzie. — Michelin Guide

Once home to journalist William Lyon Mackenzie, Toronto's first mayor (elected in 1834) and designer of the city's coat of arms, this Greek Revival row house is now a museum. — Fodor's

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Canada's Wonderland

Toronto 80 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Yogi Bear, Fred Flintstone, and Scooby Doo are part of Canada's first theme park, filled with more than 200 games, rides, restaurants, and shops. — Fodor's

Amusement park lovers will want to trek to this, Canada's largest. — Lonely Planet

Out of town but well worth a family visit, this does all the things giant amusement parks do. — Time Out

An hour north of Toronto lies what some say is Canada's answer to Disney World. — Frommer's

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High Park

Queen West, Chinatown & Little Italy 79 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This 161-hectare (398-acre) park in the far west of Midtown was architect John G. Howard's gift to the city. — Frommer's

Toronto's favorite and best-known park is a wonderful place to unfurl a picnic blanket. — Lonely Planet

Hundreds of Torontonians and guests arrive at dinnertime and picnic on blankets before the show. — Fodor's

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  • Outdoors
    16 parks, gardens and outdoor attractions
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    12 museums and galleries
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    8 places of historical interest

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