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Dublin

101 expert recommended attractions

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Chester Beatty Library

Grafton Street & Around 95 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Bibliophiles will be enthralled by the Chester Beatty Library, home to a vast collection of manuscripts and books, as well as prints and paintings — Condé Nast Traveler

Sir Alfred Chester Beatty was an American of Irish heritage who made a fortune in the mining industry and collected rare manuscripts. — Frommer's

Sir Alfred Chester Beatty established one of the most beautiful collections of Islamic and Far Eastern art... part of it is permanently exhibited on the edge of the gardens of Dublin Castle. — Michelin Guide

The world-famous library, in the grounds of Dublin Castle, houses the collection of mining engineer Sir Alfred Chester Beatty (1875–1968), bequeathed to the Irish State on his death. — Lonely Planet

Many of the finest works from Sir Alfred Chester Beatty's priceless art collection are housed in this purpose-built museum. — Time Out

Guinness Storehouse

Kilmainham & the Liberties 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Ireland's all-dominating brewery—founded by Arthur Guinness in 1759 and at one time the largest stout-producing brewery in the world—spans a 60-acre spread west of Christ Church Cathedral. — Fodor's

This 'visitor experience', housed in a six-storey listed building dating from 1904, has become the popular public face of what is undoubtedly Ireland's most recognisable brand. — Time Out

So you’ve been to St. Patrick’s Cathedral, you’ve been to St. Michan’s Church, you’ve been to Christ Church Cathedral, and you figure you’ve seen Dublin’s main religious structures. Not... — Let's Go

Tour the laboratory to taste and smell the raw ingredients, and learn from the professional tasters. — Concierge

Founded in 1759, the Guinness Brewery is one of the world's most famous breweries, producing a distinctive dark stout. — Frommer's

The Book of Kells and the Old Library Exhibition

Grafton Street & Around 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Home to Ireland's largest collection of books and manuscripts, the Old Library's principal treasure is the Book of Kells. — Fodor's

A 1960's Brutalist building set amid Trinity College's brilliant historic setting creates stark architectural contrast and delightful dissonance. — Travel + Leisure

'Kelly's Book', as it still gets called occasionally, is Trinity's most famous artefact, but it suffers slightly from Mona Lisa syndrome. — Time Out

This hand-drawn manuscript of the four gospels, dating to the year 800, is one of Ireland’s national treasures. — Frommer's

To the south of the square is the Old Library, built in a rather severe style by Thomas Burgh between 1712 and 1732. — Lonely Planet

National Gallery of Ireland

Grafton Street & Around 91 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A standout collection of European masters. Articles Surprising Dublin. — Travel + Leisure

A fine seven-century-wide collection of European art and... introduction to Irish painting. — Concierge

Though relatively small, the National Gallery of Ireland holds an extensive number of works by Irish artists — Condé Nast Traveler

The National Gallery has one of Europe's best collections — Michelin Guide

One of Europe's finest smaller art museums... the collection holds more than 2,500 paintings and some 10,000 other works. — Fodor's

Saint Patrick's Cathedral

Grafton Street & Around 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This is the largest church in Ireland, and one of the best-loved churches in the world. — Frommer's

The largest cathedral in Dublin and also the national cathedral of the Church of Ireland, St. Patrick's was built in honor of Ireland's patron saint. — Fodor's

This, the largest church in Ireland, dates from the 13th century but was founded on a far older religious site associated with St Patrick and dating from the fifth century. — Time Out

Not much remains of the original 12C church built close to the fountain (rediscovered in 1901) where the patron saint of Ireland is said to have baptised his first followers. — Michelin Guide

It was at this cathedral, reputedly, that St Paddy himself dunked the Irish heathens into the waters of a well. — Lonely Planet

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St. Stephen's Green

Grafton Street & Around 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

A lovely spot to be one with nature in the heart of the city! — Afar Magazine

The buildings around the square date mainly from the mid-18th century, when the green was landscaped and became the centrepiece of Georgian Dublin. — Lonely Planet

This lovely urban park is filled with public art, and there always seems to be something new and imaginative — Frommer's

This green space... took on its present appearance when the brewer Arthur Guiness transformed it into a public garden. — Michelin Guide

Flower gardens, formal lawns, a Victorian bandstand, and an ornamental lake all within the park's borders. — Fodor's

National Museum of Ireland - Decorative Arts & History

North of the Liffey 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

As magnificent as any structure you'll see in Ireland. — Lonely Planet

Collins Barracks (1700) used to house 3 000 men and 1 000 horses... the displays cover decorative arts. — Michelin Guide

Housed in the breathtaking confines of the barracks... this branch of the National Museum of Ireland contains the nation's most significant collection of decorative art. — Time Out

As the name of this branch of the National Museum of Ireland suggests, this museum is unusually located in a converted 18th-century army building — Frommer's

In one gigantic treasure chest, is the full panoply of the National Museum's collection of glass, silver, furniture, and other decorative arts. — Fodor's

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National Museum of Ireland - Archaeology

Grafton Street & Around 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The mother of Irish museums and the country’s most important cultural institution was established in 1977 as the primary repository of the nation’s archaeological treasures. — Lonely Planet

With Collins Barracks, this forms the setting for the collections of the National Museum and focuses on archaeological and Celtic items, including the remarkable Treasury — Michelin Guide

Established in 1890, this museum is a reflection of Ireland's heritage from 2000 B.C. to the present. — Frommer's

One of four branches of The National Museum of Ireland, and home to a fabled collection of Irish artifacts dating from 7000 BC to the present. — Fodor's

Established in 1877 by the Science and Art Museums Act, the National Museum is deservedly one of Dublin's most popular attractions. — Time Out

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Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane

North of the Liffey 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Fine collection of French and Irish Impressionist art. — Time Out

This little gallery, which celebrated its 100-year anniversary in 2008, has a strong collection of Impressionist works led by Degas's Sur la Plage and Manet's La Musique aux Tuileries. — Frommer's

The Francis Bacon studio... makes this already impressive gallery a must see for art lovers and fans of the renowned British artist. — Fodor's

Home to Impressionist masterpieces, the best of modern Irish work from 1950 onward and...the actual studio of one of the 20th century’s most famous artists, Francis Bacon. — Lonely Planet

The modern art museum bears the name of Sir Hugh Lane (1875-1915), from whom the core of the collection came. — Michelin Guide

Kilmainham Gaol

Kilmainham & the Liberties 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Yes, we know that “jail” is spelled oddly in Ireland, and we know that the last thing you want to do on vacation is go to prison. But that doesn’t change the fact that Kilmainham Gaol is... — Let's Go

The old Kilmainham prison is a place of remembrance symbolising English oppression and the Irish spirit of resistance. — Michelin Guide

This remains the best-known Irish lock-up and one of the most fascinating buildings in the country. — Time Out

Leaders of many failed Irish rebellions spent their last days in this grim, forbidding structure, and it holds a special place in the myth and memory of the country. — Fodor's

A key sight for anyone interested in Ireland's struggle for independence from British rule. — Frommer's

Dublin Castle

Grafton Street & Around 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Highlights include the 13th-century record tower; the state apartments, once the residence of English viceroys; and the chapel royal. — Frommer's

As seat and symbol of the British rule of Ireland for more than seven centuries, Dublin Castle figured largely in Ireland's turbulent history early in the 20th century. — Fodor's

The stronghold of British power in Ireland for 700 years is principally an 18th-century creation that is more hotch-potch palace than medieval castle. — Lonely Planet

At the urban heart of Dublin, it has evolved from an imposing fortress into an administrative hub... and is today the symbol of the Irish State — Michelin Guide

Wandering the lavishly decorated rooms (which are sometimes closer to dizzyingly gaudy than merely ornate), you'll learn other golden nuggets of information — Afar Magazine

Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA)

Kilmainham & the Liberties 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

IMMA commissions site-specific works by an international roster of contemporary artists and displays them in a vast set of buildings that were once the Royal Hospital Kilmainham. — Travel + Leisure

In the splendidly restored 17th-century edifice known as the Royal Hospital, the IMMA is frequently used as a venue for theatrical and musical events. — Frommer's

One of the most important 17th-century buildings in Ireland, the Royal Hospital was designed by Sir William Robinson in 1684 to serve as a nursing home for retired soldiers. — Time Out

This museum exhibits 20C Irish and international art, as well as putting on associated live theatre and music performances. — Michelin Guide

The museum is a must for any art enthusiasts visiting Dublin! — Afar Magazine

Phoenix Park

North of the Liffey 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Europe’s largest enclosed urban park—encompassing more than 1,700 acres—is set just two miles west from the city center. — Travel + Leisure

Europe's largest public park, which extends about 5 km (3 mi) along the Liffey's north bank, encompasses 1,752 acres holds a lot of verdant green lawns, woods, lakes, and playing fields. — Fodor's

Phoenix Park has something for everybody. — Afar Magazine

One of the world’s largest city parks is where you’ll find MP3-rigged joggers, grannies pushing buggies, ladies walking poodles, gardens, lakes, a sporting oval, and 300 deer. — Lonely Planet

The vast green expanses of Phoenix Park are Dublin's playground, and it's easy to see why. — Frommer's

National Museum of Ireland - Natural History

Merrion Square & Around 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Compared to the multimedia this and interactive that of virtually every modern museum, this is a beautifully preserved example of Victorian charm and scientific wonderment. — Lonely Planet

Purpose-built in 1890, the museum houses the country's archaeological collections. An audiovisual presentation helps put into context the masterpieces of Irish art displayed in the... — Michelin Guide

Housed in a graceful building that is itself a sort of exhibit... this archaeological museum explores Ireland’s ancient Celtic heritage. — Travel + Leisure

The section on Ireland's prehistoric gold, including exquisitely-wrought jewellery from the bronze and iron ages, is particularly interesting. — Afar Magazine

This unusual museum is not just a museum of science and animals, it's also a museum of museums. — Frommer's

Marsh's Library

Grafton Street & Around 87 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This magnificently preserved scholars' library, virtually unchanged in three centuries, is one of Dublin's most beautiful open secrets, and an absolute highlight of any visit. — Lonely Planet

Though visitors tend to flock to see the Book of Kells, less make the journey down to Marsh’s Library, the atmospheric home to nearly 25,000 rare books. The library hasn’t changed in... — Condé Nast Traveler

The first public library in Ireland was built in 1701 by archbishop Narcissus Marsh. There are 25 000 volumes here — Michelin Guide

This caged library, founded in 1701, is the real thing. Unlike Trinity College's Long Room, which is largely for show these days, Marsh's Library is still functioning. — Frommer's

When Ireland's first public library was founded and endowed in 1701 by Narcissus Marsh, the Archbishop of Dublin, it was made open to "All Graduates and Gentlemen". — Fodor's

Trinity College Dublin

Grafton Street & Around 86 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The oldest university in Ireland, Trinity was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I to offer an education to the children of the upper classes. — Frommer's

Founded in 1592 by Elizabeth I... among its famous students are the writers Swift, Wilde, Stocker and Beckett. — Michelin Guide

An oasis of tranquillity in the teeming center of Dublin, this campus of wide green lawns and stately 16th-century buildings is the city’s undisputed jewel. — Travel + Leisure

With its enormous library and host of distinguished alumni including Jonathan Swift (although who knows why they’re proud of that, he was a psychopath who advocated eating Irish children... — Let's Go

The Book of Kells is an illustrated Latin manuscript of the four Gospels, probably written in the early ninth century — Afar Magazine

Dublin Writers Museum

North of the Liffey 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This is an excellent little museum that represents the best of what literary galleries can be, and lovers of Irish literature will find it hard to tear themselves away. — Frommer's

The literary heritage of Ireland is something quite remarkable, when you consider the size of the island. This small country has produced many literary legends—Oscar Wilde, James Joyce... — Condé Nast Traveler

Memorabilia aplenty and lots of literary ephemera line the walls and display cabinets of this elegant museum devoted to preserving the city’s rich literary tradition up to 1970. — Lonely Planet

The Writers' Museum is devoted to the works of Irish writers, particularly those from Dublin, who have won no fewer than 4 Nobel prizes ( Yeats, Shaw, Beckett and Heaney). — Michelin Guide

"If you would know Ireland—body and soul—you must read its poems and stories," wrote W. B. Yeats in 1891. — Fodor's

Christ Church Cathedral

Kilmainham & the Liberties 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Its hilltop location and eye-catching flying buttresses make this the most photogenic by far of Dublin's three cathedrals as well as one of the capital's most recognisable symbols. — Lonely Planet

Dubliners chiefly know it as a place to hear the bells ring out on New Year's Eve (it boasts 'the largest full-circle ringing peal in the world') and for the beautiful choral evensongs. — Time Out

The vast, sturdy crypt, with its 12th- and 13th-century vaults, is Dublin's oldest surviving structure and the building's most notable feature. — Fodor's

This magnificent cathedral was designed to be seen from the river, so walk to it from the riverside in order to truly appreciate its size. — Frommer's

A popular venue to host many high profile concerts throughout the year. — Afar Magazine

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Four Courts

North of the Liffey 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The building erected in 1785 by Thomas Cooley and James Gandon housed 4 courts — Michelin Guide

The stately Corinthian portico and the circular central hall warrant a visit to the seat of the High Court of Civil Law in Ireland. — Fodor's

Home to the Irish law courts since 1796, this fine 18th-century building overlooks the north bank of the Liffey on Dublin's west side. — Frommer's

James Gandon’s (1743–1823) masterpiece is a mammoth complex stretching 130m along Inns Quay, as fine an example of Georgian public architecture as there is in Dublin. — Lonely Planet

Set in several pretty Georgian buildings overlooking the Liffey, this friendly hostel has all the basics, and a few charming details besides. — Time Out

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St. Michan's Church

North of the Liffey 84 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

There has been a place of worship on this site since 1096, and the current building dates from 1686, though it was drastically restored in 1828 and again following the Civil War. — Time Out

Walking into this somber, dignified Protestant church with its magnificent organ is certainly impressive—but the star attraction here is underneath your feet. — Travel + Leisure

Built on the site of an early Danish chapel (1095), this 17th-century edifice has fine interior woodwork and an organ (dated 1724) on which Handel is said to have played his Messiah — Frommer's

Founded in 1095 by the Danes, the church was later rebuilt. Handel is said to have composed his famous Messiah on the organ. — Michelin Guide

However macabre, St. Michan's main claim to fame is down in the vaults, where the totally dry atmosphere has preserved several corpses in a remarkable state of mummification. — Fodor's

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  • Museums
    31 museums and galleries
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    23 places of historical interest
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    13 parks, gardens and outdoor attractions

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