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London

351 expert recommended attractions

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Tate Modern

Southwark 96 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Within the gallery rooms are Rothko and Picasso, Mondrian and Delvaux in glorious relief to... stark surroundings. — Let's Go

This spectacular renovation of a mid-20th-century power station is one of the most-visited museums of modern art in the world. — Fodor's

Herzog and de Meuron dazzler. — Not For Tourists

Welcoming more than four million visitors a year, Tate Modern is the world's most popular modern art gallery (the free admission helps), and one of the capital's very best attractions. — Frommer's

One of London's most popular attractions, this outstanding modern and contemporary art gallery is housed in the creatively revamped Bankside Power Station south of the Millennium Bridge. — Lonely Planet

British Museum

Bloomsbury 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This celebrated treasure house, filled with plunder of incalculable value and beauty from around the globe, occupies an immense, imposing neoclassical building in the heart of Bloomsbury. — Fodor's

If the museum has one central, unifying theme, it's to provide an overview of the development of human culture, illustrated with items from all of the world's major civilizations. — Frommer's

One of the single greatest museums in the world, the British Museum houses collections that date from the prehistoric to the modern—in sum, the works of mankind. — Concierge

The British Museum is one of the most remarkable institutions of its kind and its collections encompass a vast span of historical civilisation. — Michelin Guide

Founded in 1753, it covers more than two million years of history from every continent, including the first known image of Christ, the oldest man-made tools on earth, and the Rosetta Stone. — Travel + Leisure

Natural History Museum

South Kensington 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

On its own, the architecture of the Natural History Museum is enough of a reason to walk through its doors one afternoon. The stunning archways and staircases create a grand backdrop to... — Afar Magazine

Built in 1881, the Natural History Museum is also a world-renowned research center and boasts as much historical significance as scientific: Specimens collected by Darwin can be still be... — goop

Beeline for the back of the museum to see the unrepeatable Cadogan Gallery: a collection of British treasures — Let's Go

This is just one of the three huge galleries (all free) off Exhibition Road in South Kensington, the others being the Science Museum and the V&A. — Concierge

One of three frontages in the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Natural History Museum is one mile in depth and has two façades 1,000 feet long.  Architecture buffs, start planning your... — Travel + Leisure

National Gallery

Trafalgar Square / Embankment 94 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Founded in 1824 to display a collection of just 36 paintings, today the National Gallery is home to more than 2,000 works. — Time Out

The focal point of Trafalgar Square, the perennially popular National Gallery is one of the capital's main attractions. — Michelin Guide

With some 2300 European paintings on display, this is one of the richest art galleries in the world. — Lonely Planet

Here, locals and sightseers regard the finest works of art from the 13th to the 19th centuries, like Sunflowers by Vincent van Gogh, Bathers at Asnières by Georges-Pierre Seurat, and my... — Travel + Leisure

For the sheer skill of its display and arrangement, the National surpasses its counterparts. — Frommer's

Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

Southwark 93 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This is a recent re-creation of one of the most important public theatres ever built, Shakespeare's Globe, where the Bard premiered many of his most famous plays. — Frommer's

From April to October, open-air productions are staged in this authentic oak-and-thatch replica of an Elizabethan theater. In the chilly, winter months see a performance at the smaller... — Departures

This spectacular theater is a replica of Shakespeare's open-roof, wood-and-thatch Globe Playhouse. — Fodor's

A ticket to the exhibitions and tour... includes a 45min. walkthrough of the theater, chock full of anecdotes about bear-baiting, current productions, and the list of fire hazards — Let's Go

The centre's brief is to encourage the study and dramatic interpretation of Shakespeare's work. — Michelin Guide

Buckingham Palace

Westminster 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Built in 1703 for the Duke of Buckingham, Buckingham Palace replaced St James's Palace as the monarch's official London residence in 1837. — Lonely Planet

The queen's London pied-à-terre is not the most beautiful of palaces, but it's big. — Concierge

It's rare to get a chance to see how the other half—well, other minute fraction—lives and works. — Fodor's

Buckingham Palace is a focal point for Londoners and visitors alike; the city's uplifting royal ceremonial events, uniting monarch and people, primarily take place here and in its vicinity. — Michelin Guide

From late July to early October, though, the royals head to Balmoral, and the State Rooms are opened to the public. — Let's Go

Geffrye Museum

London 92 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

In contrast to the West End's grand aristocratic town houses, this charming museum is devoted to the life of the city's middle class over the years. — Fodor's

If you find yourself in Shoreditch, consider taking a quick trip to the Geffrye Museum. The focus here is on homes and home décor, specifically how both have changed over the span of 40... — goop

If you'd like an overview of British interiors and lifestyles of the past 4 centuries, head to this museum, housed in a series of restored 18th-century almshouses. — Frommer's

Taking visitors on a journey through time, the Geffrye Museum offers a unique look at English middle-class life from the 1600s to present day. — Travel + Leisure

This series of beautiful 18th-century ivy-clad almshouses, with an extensive and well-presented herb garden, was first opened as a museum in 1914. — Lonely Planet

Tower of London

City of London 91 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Founded by William the Conqueror in 1066, this huge fortified palace-jail-treasury-arsenal is the source of some of the most-famous tourist photo ops in all of England. — Concierge

The scene for many dramatic events during this country's history — Condé Nast Traveler

Kings and Queens. Surprisingly insightful, annoyingly expensive. — Not For Tourists

The unmissable Tower of London (actually a castle of 20-odd towers) offers a window on to a gruesome and quite compelling history. — Lonely Planet

Visitors to this turreted riverside castle enter a thousand years of history filled with cultural significance (but go early to avoid lines to see the crown jewels). Tudor fans can view... — Afar Magazine

Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

London 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Victorian-era greenhouses and the sprawling grounds overflow with 33,000 species of flowers, plants, and trees (the world’s largest living collection). — Travel + Leisure

In 1759 botanists began rummaging around the world for specimens they could plant in the 3-hectare plot known as the Royal Botanic Gardens. — Lonely Planet

It's essentially a vast scientific research center that also happens to be extraordinarily beautiful. — Frommer's

Enter the Royal Botanic Gardens, as Kew Gardens are officially known, and you are enveloped by blazes of color, extraordinary blooms, hidden trails, and lovely old follies. — Fodor's

Combine a cultural legacy of landscaping and royal extravagance, and you get Kew Gardens—a sprawling Shangri-la only visited by the most thorough of tourists (even London locals don’t get... — Let's Go

Tower Bridge

London 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Messing about on the water. — Not For Tourists

Despite its medieval, fairy-tale appearance, Britain's most iconic bridge was actually built at the tail end of the Victorian age, first opening to traffic in 1894. — Fodor's

Compared to London Bridge, Tower Bridge definitely wins on the aesthetic front (unless we’re counting children’s nursery rhymes). — Let's Go

London was a thriving port in 1894 when elegant Tower Bridge was built. Designed to be raised to allow ships to pass, electricity has now taken over from the original steam and hydaulic engines. — Lonely Planet

It's a low bridge equipped with two mighty 1,000-tonne (1,100 U.S.-ton) decks, technically known as bascules, which raise to let ships pass below. This happens around 900 times year. — Frommer's

Wallace Collection

Marylebone 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Arguably London’s finest smaller gallery, the Wallace Collection is an enthralling glimpse into 18th-century aristocratic life. — Lonely Planet

A treat along the lines of the Frick in New York, wherein the setting is as much of a draw as the art, the Wallace Collection is spread out over the 28 rooms of a gracious mansion in the West End. — Concierge

The largest private art collection, bequeathed to the nation in 1900, can be found in Hertford House, a beautiful private mansion in Marylebone. — Michelin Guide

Housed in a former estate home, the collection of Titian, Rembrandt, and Velázquez also features a vast amount of shiny knights’ armour.  Children can get dressed-up in samples, too,... — Travel + Leisure

Tucked inside a townhouse in Marylebone, this small but impressive collection boasts French and Dutch paintings, furniture, and decorative objects from the 15th-18th centuries — Condé Nast Traveler

National Portrait Gallery

Trafalgar Square / Embankment 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Explore portraits of famous citizens from Tudor Kings and Queens like King Henry VII in 1505 to the Bronte Sisters in 1834. For a more contemporary piece, check out David Beckham, filmed... — Travel + Leisure

Founded in 1856, the National Portrait Gallery has since 1896 occupied a late-19C Italian Renaissance-style building neighbouring the National Gallery. — Michelin Guide

Portraits don't have to be stuffy. The National Portrait Gallery has everything from oil paintings of stiff-backed royals to photos of soccer stars and gloriously unflattering political caricatures. — Time Out

The National Portrait Gallery was founded in 1856 with a single aim: to gather together portraits of famous (and infamous) British men and women. — Fodor's

Pictures have been chosen on the basis of who the subject is, not how well they've been captured by the artist. — Frommer's

Science Museum

South Kensington 90 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

This temple to the sciences - 5 floors covering 5ha in all - is remarkable for the richness of its collections, and for the methods it employs to engage visitors. — Michelin Guide

Covering all aspects of science, technology, and medicine, the Science Museum is the star of the trio of museums on Exhibition Road (the others are the V&A and the Natural History Museum). — Concierge

With seven floors of interactive and educational exhibits, this scientifically spellbinding museum will mesmerise adults and children alike, covering everything from early technology to space travel. — Lonely Planet

This, one of the three great South Kensington museums, stands next to the Natural History Museum in a far plainer building. — Fodor's

The Science Museum features seven floors of educational and entertaining exhibits, including the Apollo 10 command module and a flight simulator. — Time Out

Regent's Park

Regent's Park / Kings Cross 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The most elaborate and ordered of London’s many parks, this one was created around 1820 by John Nash, who planned to use it as an estate to build palaces for the aristocracy. — Lonely Planet

Regent's Park is one of London's most popular open spaces, covering 410 acres in north-west London. — Time Out

While the Prince Regent (George IV) was a laudanum addict who amassed today’s equivalent of £50 million in debt, his legacy now lies in some of the most aesthetically pleasing spaces in... — Let's Go

Made up of 166 hectares and has a rose garden with more than 400 varieties of roses. — Condé Nast Traveler

Regent's Park in London lives up to its name and is quite royal, boasting rows of manicured flowers and plants. — Afar Magazine

Westminster Abbey

Westminster 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Westminster Abbey is a mixture of architectural styles, but considered the finest example of Early English Gothic (1190–1300). It's not merely a beautiful place of worship, though. — Lonely Planet

Built at Henry VII's behest in the early 16C, this magnificent chapel is a fine example of the Perpendicular style. The pillars support magnificent fan vaulting on projecting keystones... — Michelin Guide

The Abbey is not just one of the finest examples of ecclesiastical architecture in Europe, it's also the shrine of the nation where monarchs are anointed before their God. — Frommer's

Nearly all important British church ceremonies take place here—including William and Kate’s wedding — Let's Go

Steeped in millennia of rich and often bloody history, Westminster Abbey is one of England's most iconic buildings. — Fodor's

Royal Albert Hall

South Kensington 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

In addition to being a great concert venue, the Royal Albert is also one of London’s great landmarks, and you don’t need a seat to enjoy it. — Frommer's

Built as a memorial to Queen Victoria's husband in 1871, the Royal Albert Hall's vast rotunda was once described by the monarch as looking like 'the British constitution'. — Time Out

A Victorian creation but in the Italian Renaissance style, the Albert Hall (1867 to 1871) is brick built with a terracotta frieze bringing to mind the triumph of Art and Literature and a metal Dome. — Michelin Guide

One stunner of a music hall, inside and out. — Not For Tourists

Established in 1871, the Royal Albert Hall fulfilled Prince Albert’s vision for a central hall to promote the arts and sciences. — Travel + Leisure

Kenwood House

London 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

We often walk up through the Hampstead Heath Woods to Kenwood, mostly to roam around the grounds and have a look at Henry Moore’s Two Piece Reclining Figure and Barbara Hepworth’s... — On the Grid

Kenwood House was built as a gentleman's country home and was later enlarged and decorated by Scottish architect Robert Adam, starting in 1764. — Frommer's

Adam refaced most of the exterior and added the splendid library, which, with its vaulted ceiling and Corinthian columns, is the highlight of the house for design aficionados. — Fodor's

A superb collection of 63 Old Master paintings, acquired during a remarkably astute four-year spending spree between 1897 and 1891. — Time Out

Situated atop Hampstead Heath, this lakefront estate features a Neoclassical villa housing a collection of world-renowned paintings. — Travel + Leisure

Dennis Severs' House

Spitalfields 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

Dennis Severs’ House is a time capsule attraction in which visitors are immersed in a unique form of theatre. — Time Out

This is more of an experience than a visit; home to American artist Dennis Severs who died in 2000, every room in this Georgian house represents a step back into history. — Michelin Guide

The rooms have been arranged as if they have just been vacated by their previous occupants, with items carelessly strewn about and food left uncleared. — Frommer's

Inside this 1724 Georgian residence is a “still-life drama” created by late American artist Dennis Severs. — Travel + Leisure

The remarkable interiors of this extraordinary time machine of a house are the creation of Dennis Severs (1948–99), a performer-designer-scholar from Escondido, California. — Fodor's

The London Eye

Southbank 89 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

You're free to move around inside the pod during its voyage, although everyone tends to congregate in the northern half to look out over the river and the heart of sightseeing London. — Frommer's

This giant Ferris wheel is the largest cantilevered observation wheel ever built and among the city's tallest structures. — Fodor's

Originally built for the new millennium, this mammoth Ferris wheel has 32 dangling pods (each holds 25 people sitting or standing) that gracefully take flight 443 feet above the city. — Travel + Leisure

Not for the faint of heart... stunning views of the entire city of London. — Condé Nast Traveler

Two words: Tourist. Trap. Nice view though. — Not For Tourists

ZSL London Zoo

London 88 The TripExpert score is determined by calculating the general consensus of expert reviewers. Learn more →

The Zoo, which opened to the public in 1847, covers 36 acres. — Time Out

Founded in 1828, the zoo's mission is to successfully breed endangered species and undertake biological research on rare breeds. — Michelin Guide

Operated by the nonprofit Zoological Society of London, this was the new home of the Royal animals collection when it moved here from the Tower of London in 1828. — Fodor's

These famous zoological gardens have come a long way since being established in 1828, with massive investment making conservation, education and breeding the name of the game. — Lonely Planet

When London Zoo -- one of the finest big city zoos in the world -- was founded back in 1820, it was purely for the purposes of scientific research. — Frommer's

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